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Technology Alone Isn't Healthcare's Savior
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rboates
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rboates,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/6/2014 | 8:37:14 AM
High Tech + High Touch
Fortunate will be the patients who proactively utilize appropriate tools to optimize their health and have trusted relationships with experienced, skilled professionals that can interpret and offer guidance. 
Fortunate will be the health professionals that strike a healthy balance between the benefits of technology with the importance of addressing the emotional, psychological and spiritual aspects of being human that can't be addressed by technology alone. 
Unfortunate are those that think the best outcomes are primarily derived from more technology, data and better algorithms. 
Unfortunate are those that fail to see the value and importance of emerging information technologies. 
Success will come to those having the wisdom to appropriately combine high tech with high touch.

Overconfidence in intellectual-technological solutions to complex challenges leads to dehumanizing and obsolete rules. 

Humility combined with respect for human ingenuity and creativity yields faith in the potential for new technologies to yield progress.
KennethW393
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KennethW393,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/25/2013 | 10:11:54 PM
re: Technology Alone Isn't Healthcare's Savior
What a well-written, articulate synopsis of many of the problems facing healthcare today! Thank you for the article, Rebecca. Unfortunately, the constraints put upon healthcare from coding to Meaningful Use timelines, seem to be counterproductive to the evolution of what will actually work in real life.
ladolcevitaintx
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ladolcevitaintx,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/27/2013 | 7:35:41 PM
re: Technology Alone Isn't Healthcare's Savior
Rebecca, what a perfect article and timing. As I continue to research software, mobile apps, tablet apps, you get my point here. All anyone is talking about is the APP and how its changing everything. What everyone is forgetting is the PROCESSES, the WORKFLOWS, and the people. A mobile app is not the end to our problem. Its probably the beginning if everyone doesnt stop and look at the rest of the process. Before anyone even attempts to create a mobile app they need to be looking at the process and workflow. A mobile app is a BUSINESS, it IS NOT a application that runs its self. Look at all the successful apps today...they are changing, updating, fixing, all the time. A mobile app is a business that needs support, maintenance, education, documentation, marketing and LUCK right now.
jaysimmons
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jaysimmons,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 7:01:47 PM
re: Technology Alone Isn't Healthcare's Savior
I completely agree with you Rebecca. Better technology alone will not be enough for an institution to succeed in their goals. They need structure and need to set out plans and foundations so they can then mold the technology to serve their purposes. Attesting for MU shouldnG«÷t be the only goal, the ultimate goal should be to provide better, safer care for all patients.

Jay Simmons
Information Week Contributor
Yangtze
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Yangtze,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/18/2013 | 1:37:29 PM
re: Technology Alone Isn't Healthcare's Savior
Great article, Rebecca. This is a great example of why I strongly feel that IT requires a business purpose. As you said, people think IT will save us all. But I like to add that if the "business" is not directly tied to the IT initiative, you end up with a system that does not match the business. The data and process flow of the system MUST match the business process it is designed to help and/or augment.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2013 | 7:48:40 PM
re: Technology Alone Isn't Healthcare's Savior
This is such an important message, Rebecca, thanks for sharing it. Standardizing workflows and processes to make effective use of technology will be a painful process, but it'll also be one that separates winners and losers, since those who do the process work well will be able to deliver better care cheaper. It reminds me in some ways of when I was covering the automotive industry in the early '90s, watching auto parts makers revamp their work using "total quality management" and continuous improvement to survive as carmakers demanded better quality at ever-lower costs. Healthcare will never be manufacturing, and shouldn't be, but there are lessons to be learned in terms of process discipline and continuous improvement.


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