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Healthcare Organizations Go Big For Analytics
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fpoggio600
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fpoggio600,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/27/2013 | 2:28:20 PM
re: Healthcare Organizations Go Big For Analytics
Big Data and Analytics could be the next EHR Boondoogle...see:

http://www.kelzongroup.com/Big_Data.html

Frank Poggio

The Kelzon Group

kelzonGroup.com
jaysimmons
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jaysimmons,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 7:03:04 PM
re: Healthcare Organizations Go Big For Analytics
Healthcare providers are starting to realize how important and useful big data and data analytics can be for them. Gathering information on their patients, getting to know their target demographics, and analyzing the data are tools that help identify at risk patients and take a proactive approach to their healthcare. Using not only data collected from their own EHR systems but also from a multitude of sources like insurance companies and telephone apps also allows them to gather a wider range of data on their patients and will be very useful in big data analytics.

Jay Simmons
Information Week Contributor
andyx
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andyx,
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3/21/2013 | 2:21:20 PM
re: Healthcare Organizations Go Big For Analytics
It should not be lost to any dedicated Healthcare institution that the major presumption of this article and Organizations' actions is that claims data is accurate and reliable. In the public healthcare management environment, it is clear that the data is corrupted by criminal fraud, waste and abuse to such an extent that CMS must pay almost $1Billion per year to make sure it does not make "improper payments". If there is an example of a comprehensive claims data base (even in the private sector) satisfying the requirements of "analytics" I would like to know who possessess that data and how access to it for purely R&D interests might be obtained. In fact, I would be surprised if any private sector claims payment organization had its valid, relaible, multi-year data for its own clients.
I do not argue that claims data is available at massive levels (exabytes) annually, but most analysts know (mostly as an inside joke) that such data is corrupted to the extent that statistical and analytical techniques cannot be effectively employed because basic data assumptions for use of such technigues cannot be satisfied.
Just because there exists a lot of data does not mean it should be used, on the other hand, as we see today, this is no prohibition that the data can not be used.
NG11209
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NG11209,
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3/19/2013 | 5:25:35 PM
re: Healthcare Organizations Go Big For Analytics
Interesting that a cross-healthcare observer sees insurance claims as the largest source of healthcare analytics data today. It makes sense, though G«Ų claim data should provide a very accurate view of both individual and population healthcare usage trends, which can help control costs and identify areas that can be addressed proactively to reduce expensive treatments later.


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