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The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
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Midnight
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Midnight,
User Rank: Guru
3/21/2013 | 8:06:07 PM
re: The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
I invite people to consider a very important concept. BYOD is a myth because it is not new. The acronym was made up by marketing folks trying to slip one into IT's language. My advice is Don't Buy In Any Further.
This is flying in the face of the current media pressure wave, so why would I say something so seemingly counter-intuitive? The answer is in our history as IT. Trivia question - What was the first "BYOD" wave? And how did affect business as a whole? As much as Microsoft or Apple would want to claim that crown, it was neither. If you don't remember the Commodore 64/128 computers, then look them up in the history books of the '80s. These were the first PC type computers that made a real change in the way we do business. (Brief history) Back then it was the age of the mainframe. Accounting had to wait for batch jobs just to get a spreadsheet done. Enter these little machines running CPM OS, that could do the same job right on the desk without waiting for a mainframe queue. It was pure magic at the time. The result was a wildfire expansion of vendors, custom applications and incompatible file formats. (sound familiar) Modern IT policies and procedures were born from this madness and refined over decades.
So now the new "kids" want to bring their toys to class and are trying their hardest to make us believe that this environment is in some way "new." Smartphone tech was addressed when we incorporated Blackberry technologies. As soon as the "new" smartphone vendors embrace the enterprise with the commitment that RIM did, then the vendors and devices become valid contenders and deserve our (meaning IT departments) evaluation for adoption. And any plan for bringing ANY device into a network should be balanced against history and lessons learned. BYOD as being described today is a 20 year step backwards regarding management, ROI, security, and stability. If you don't see the blatantly obvious road that we have already walked, then you really are not paying attention. There, now you see the elephant in the room, what do you do now.
Byurcan
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Byurcan,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 8:03:11 PM
re: The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
I wonder if that acronym will catch on!
David Berlind
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David Berlind,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 7:52:48 PM
re: The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
Thanks Bryan. The myriad options with end users clamoring for support on why some little feature isn't working properly will drive the need to standardize. It's practically a time honored tradition in IT circles. It'll be BYODALAIOTAL. Bring your own device as long as it's on the approved list.
David Berlind
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David Berlind,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 7:30:54 PM
re: The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
Lorna, the Chromebook, Cromebox, and Chrome browser (desktop, mobile, tabelet) all align very nicely to create a compelling reason for going all cloud. I have all of the above and to the extent that Google's cloud embodies my computing environment, I can pick any one of the devices to engage with that environment as though it's one of the other devices. Maybe the Chromebook is better when I have to draft some letters on the train. The Chromebox hooked to a big flat panel at my desk is great too. Then, my Nexus 7 tablet and Android phone for going even more portable. If I'm looking at some Web page on my Chromebook, I can flip to that same page very easily on any of the other devices. Google's cloud keeps them all in sync for me (bookmarks, passwords, etc. too). But, to get the full benefits, you almost have to go full cloud which is a big business decision that has to come from the top. Otherwise, heavy clients will work their way in.
lgarey@techweb.com
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lgarey@techweb.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 3:52:58 PM
re: The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
I think the Chromebook is Google's secret weapon. People can't do everything on phones or even tablets, and the attractiveness of $250, lightweight laptop as a complement to an Android phone is powerful. As you say, people who buy in to Google's cloud don't have to spend for an iPad plus a keyboard, and they don't have to deal with the security issues of Windows. Lorna Garey, IW Reports
Byurcan
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Byurcan,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 3:50:12 PM
re: The End Of BYOD As We Know It?
Interesting thoughts. As noted, many companies were already struggling to adopt a strict set of BYOD standards even with only one or two different devices primarily being used among employees. As the use of mobile devices diversifies, I agree this could lead to some form corporate BYOD boundaries, which while may be against the "spirit" of BYOD could become necessary.
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