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When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
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professional web design
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professional web design,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2013 | 11:23:02 AM
re: When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
Hard to see it as a power-posture when wearing flip-flops...
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 8:44:24 PM
re: When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
Thanks, wht. You make some great points. I think what you get from social media is more of the human factor. And, where this particular event has hit so close to home for me and many of my friends, family and co-workers, it has definitely provided news about how people are doing/whether they are safe/how we can help.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, InformationWeek/The BrainYard
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
4/19/2013 | 5:47:38 PM
re: When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
Mainstream media (CBS, ABC, NBC, CNN, FOX, print media, etc) don't always have their stories correct, verified or not. However there is a better chance of a retraction of an article or broadcast from them when the error is discovered. Social media has much less verification, no retraction once posted, and a very high chance that you might miss seeing a correction or update. With much caution I watch and read mainstream media reports of ongoing events, with the expectation that the real story might not be known for 24-48 hours, or perhaps never, depending upon their slant and what the government wants me to believe. I take no real value in social media postings. They are just a curiosity at this point in time, feeding my thoughts of "needing to know" because I am a news junkie, and have been since the 6th grade decades ago. You might call me a slow learner!
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
4/19/2013 | 3:11:53 PM
re: When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
"Taking social media at face value" should take on a new meaning after reading a recent statistic on social media (Tweeter related identification of the suspects). The article (from MSNBC's site) cited tweets which identified the suspects by name which turned out to be inaccurate and unrelated to the actual persons involved (innocent victims of mistaken identity). Still their names were retweeted to the public in excess of 3500 times. Social media participant's generally do not follow source verification protocols and without being able to identify the source, I think that development of a lynch mob mentality could be very realistic. Maybe everyone and not just businesses should take a step back and consider their content/necessity? Will this fuel some members of the ambulance chasing legal community to consider new line of business opportunities or establishing precedents for defamation or slander based on the inaccuracies of social media?
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
4/19/2013 | 12:15:18 AM
re: When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
There does seem to be a social media etiquette emerging around disasters and tragedies that turns off the self-promotional aspect of these platforms (at least for a little while). It's a sensible development. I know I cringe when I see a Tweet promoting a blog or making a bacon joke amidst a stream of messages sharing information about a catastrophe and offering support for victims.

Drew Conry-Murray
Editor, Network Computing
Nathan Golia
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Nathan Golia,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/18/2013 | 8:33:18 PM
re: When Tragedy Strikes, It's Not Social Business As Usual
Social media is an interesting place after a catastrophe. For a long time, I had a Twitter search for "insurance sandy" live, in case of interesting leads. But I rarely felt comfortable taking any of them at face value G a lesson many have probably learned in the wake of the CNN fiasco.


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