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8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
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toothie007
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toothie007,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 3:44:47 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
In other words, Microsoft should forever ensure that Windows look like it did in 1995. God knows, as people we are too dumb to cope with even the simplest of changes. We can cope with all kind of technological advancements in automobiles for example, but some simple changes to an operating system, that is way too much. I cannot for the life of me see what is so difficult about using Windows 8. Microsoft should also let the tech media decide what it should or shouldn't do for they are that talented.
mmuzzy
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mmuzzy,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 3:58:29 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
In other words, if people don't agree with you they're dumb. Ok. Not everything needs to change for the sake of change.

No folders in the Start screen, clicking an app and going to the desktop anyway, no clear path to tasks such as shutdown, etc. Do I think Windows 8 is hard? No. Do I like using it? Not even remotely.

Hey, the shape of tires hasn't changed in a long time... we should make them square too even if no one else thinks it's a good idea. Don't like it? You must be stupid then. /s
AsokAsus
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AsokAsus,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/20/2013 | 3:36:14 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Indeed, consistency is the hobgobblin of small minds. I for one can't believe the lack of innovation in the auto industry, for example. The darn steering wheel has been on cars, for, well lets see, almost since cars were invented. They really need to do something more innovative than that stupid steering wheel. I think a tiller on the floor that you bat back and forth with your two feet would be really cool because it is so new and different. And I'd replace that obsolete brake pedal with a knob on the steering wheel. That'd be cool because it's new too.And different. And finally a throttle rope hanging from the roof would be SO much cooler than the accelerator pedal, don't you think? And you know why? Yep, you got it. Because it would be new. And different.
Greenleaf
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Greenleaf,
User Rank: Strategist
4/19/2013 | 3:51:49 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
But why make a UI which people don't like? What is Microsoft logic for doing this? Is this Microsofts new policy? Does Microsoft think that it is funny that they can have their will with us even if we don't like it? Does Microsoft hate us? Why are they insisting on yanking us around on a chain?

There have been no changes to the User Interface to cars. The steering wheel was not removed. Nor was the rear view mirror. Car manufactures change the engine to run on electric. They filter the exhaust. Microsoft changed they way that people interface with it. Why ??? They can give us a new faster OS which uses less power and a different chip set but why mess with the way we use it? What could have possibly of been their reasoning? This absolutely makes no sense !!!
glenn817
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glenn817,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:11:21 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Obviously, I think Microsoft wants us to like the UI (I for one do). The truth is, they changed it not to piss us off, but due to competitive pressure and the changing computing landscape. Ultimately, it benefits MSFT over the long term to insist on this change.

The car analogy (nor others I see here) isn't really apt, because it isn't like there are other companies introducing competing products with different approaches, like we see in the tablet/mobile space.

This is really no different than when MSFT transitioned from DOS to Windows. The mouse was far slower than keystrokes, and a lot of training had to go into teaching people to use a mouse, but who would go back to that?

My take only, I appreciate your frustration.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
4/19/2013 | 5:13:26 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Microsoft saw 100s of millions upgrading to Win8 with the opportunity to sell them all stuff via the Metro UI with the App Store, cutting off Win7. Greed pure and simple. Only problem is the purely touch screen UI doesn't work well with those using XP/Win7 non-touch screen devices so the expectation of upgrades was unfounded. Apple doesn't use the same OS on the iMac as the iPhone/iPad, something Microsoft over looked.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/20/2013 | 6:02:29 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Exactly. A fact should be pointed out about the App Store. If you go back early 2012, you will see that Microsoft was pushing the App Store pretty hard. They were engage in psychological programming of their third-party developers (like me), using the word "App" no less than 11 times in a 68-word paragraph. At the time, I didn't think much of it. I figured..."They are hell-bent on getting us to write these so-called App's...not sure why."

Then I read the fine print.

Microsoft is so hell-bent on getting us to write "apps" because each time we sell an "app" they get 20-30% of the revenue from selling our "app". But our "apps" must be Metro "apps".

That leaves regular users. Metro apps cannot run on desktop, so Microsoft has intention of getting as many users away from the desktop as possible, and herding them toward Metro, where they can collect their 20-30%. When you do the math, its tens of billions of dollars in new revenue per year.

So that is the reason. It has nothing to do with ignorance, stupidity, lack of customer-feedback...(ok well stupid, yes)...it is greed and gambling. They gambled that we users were so sheepish and pliable, they would be able to muscle us all into Metro, whether we liked it or not.

Looks like they were wrong.
quadibloc
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quadibloc,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 3:55:41 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Bring back the Start button, or add more visual cues to the Metro UI. A desktop PC is not a tablet, and should have a UI suited to the needs of its users, not to Microsoft's marketing strategy.

The real solution would be for the government to step in with a hammer, and turn operating systems with the Microsoft Windows API into commodity products, so that the market would be a fiercely competitive one that would work to the advantage of consumers.
NJ Mike
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NJ Mike,
User Rank: Strategist
4/19/2013 | 5:31:33 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
The last thing we need is for government to step in and do anything here. I don't want some un-elected bureaucrat deciding anything that effects my computer. If consumers walk away from Windows 8, either Microsoft will listen and change, or they will go the way of many other formerly large companies that couldn't keep up.
foddermail
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foddermail,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 4:40:59 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Why on Earth would the government have any right to meddle in anything to do with Microsoft at this point? They certainly cannot go after them as a monopoly at this point... The real solution is for you and I to vote with our feet and our checkbooks. That is all.
AndrewX
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AndrewX,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 4:11:01 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I got to the fourth slide, and having the entire page reload (slowly) every time you click to the next picture is just too much. How does a tech magazine get away with having such a dreadfully designed page? Not to mention, 3 out of the 4 slides I did see all said basically the same thing: "Bring back the old start menu/desktop." Not worth suffering through this drivel to finish.
Ali Al-Mozaini
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Ali Al-Mozaini,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 4:47:45 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Exactly. This article is just as badly put together as Windows 8.
NPCO
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NPCO,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 4:12:31 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Wow, some really weak arguments in this article:

"For instance, the ARM-based Windows RT operating system looks identical to Windows 8, but it won't run legacy Windows software. But Windows 8 does. Who has the time to learn the difference?"

Well, there it is right there. RT doesn't run legacy apps, Windows 8 does. Yea, who has the 3.65 seconds it takes to learn that?

"Microsoft ignores its critics and doubles down on the Modern UI. Via generous financial incentives, Microsoft sways developers to stock the Windows Store with plenty of multi-touch apps"

Yea, as if Microsoft could, in any possible way, convince every developer of every Windows application to magically create Modern UI versions... magically overnight. And this says nothing about the absolute infeasibility of actually making touch-friendly interfaces for the overwhelming majority of Windows applications. Do you really think a finger operated versions of Photoshop, Dreamweaver, InDesign or any of Adobe's other programs would be beneficial to users? How about AutoCAD? Do you really think architects and engineers want to design structures with their fingers? How about development tools, like Microsoft's own. Do you really think programmers want to program with on-screen keyboards and swipe gestures? The answers to all these questions is - NO. Touch is nice for simplistic tasks, but has absolutely no place in so many areas that loosing a desktop mouse/keyboard driven interface is patently absurd.
glenn817
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glenn817,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:16:37 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I'm not really sure that is what W8 does, I think it just adds touch as an additional means of interfacing with a computer. Once AutoCAD is open, people can use their mouse or whatever they like. BUT I do envision a future where touch in places like Photoshop and Powerpoint for example can be greatly enhanced by touch - the problem is that neither the software nor the hardware is up to snuff in this regard. There are a lot of really great parts of W8 too...

But I agree, in theory, why not keep both the Modern UI and the Start menu? One reason might be the same reason why they made the Surface in the first place - hardware and software vendors may not optimize their products if they aren't forced to. I suspect strong MS's idea was for that reason....
foddermail
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foddermail,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 4:52:24 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I agree. There wasn't really anything useful in this article. Just let Microsoft run their business. If they run it into the ground, we will use something else. If not, great! So far, there is no threat of any significant shift away from Windows or PCs. The typical PC is just lasting much longer, that's all. The recession has really made the point that people don't need a new machine every 3 years any more... When they buy iPODs, tablets and smart phones, they are primarily buying toys. I like toys, but toys really don't have any impact on my need to have several PCs.
Doc Blair
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Doc Blair,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 4:22:51 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Microsoft's move into the new era of clouds, integration, unification, and replication is nothing more than a sign of times for them. As Apple, IBM, Oracle, Cisco, Dell, Samsung, Sony, Google, all innovate on top of innovation, it is obvious that MS is attempting to build fluid a light weight interface that is symmetrical across all devices. This is new to them as well as all others in the game. But the cut throat competitive market and diversity in thinking will never allow this to happen. The result will always be good and bad.

It is actually pretty simple for a technical individual that has seen and experienced many platforms to go with the tide. In contrast, it is also very difficult for an individual that only uses a device for social or feel good experience.

Streamlining interfaces are just as critical to efficiency of the overall technical interaction as it is for the individual instance of one device.

Take some time to delve into the inner workings of the new interface and you will find that it really is no different but it adds an additional layer to integrate. Just as a social interface brings all together in one portal, The big guys are looking to bring your devices together as one within the constraints of technological capabilities.
bandrews017
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bandrews017,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:13:27 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Why on earth would Microsoft even proceed with a plan to make the UI the same for both tablets and desktops??? That's like trying to make every car produced with the possibility for the roof to fold back. Extra money...extra design...failed product...Wake up MS.
foddermail
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foddermail,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 4:54:18 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
because I can replace my 7 lb workstation laptop with a cheaper 2 lb tablet that can do everything the laptop could do and support touch. also because the integrated app store is very handy for a full PC platform. Have you tried it for more than a couple days? There are nuisances, but the trade-offs are worth it.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:22:02 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
It is now the second quarter of the new year.

Information Week only had one important New Year's Resolution this year. '"No Slide Show Articles with out a prominent 'View-as-one-page' link." How's that working out for you so far?

How many ties did you blow this in the first quarter?

When are you ever going to start respecting your readersl / clients / consumers ?
Tom LaSusa
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Tom LaSusa,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 7:52:41 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Leo,

I've already asked you once, and I don't believe you replied. Please show us where we made this New Year's Resolution? I've looked through our articles and found nothing of the sort.

Regards
Tom LaSusa
InformationWeek
jsnapp863
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jsnapp863,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:51:19 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Showing my age, I started in computers before Jobs & Gates even spoke. From the beginnings of MS, the compatibility issues abounded, as did support. Everyone in the data field put up with them, as it was "emerging technology".
As MS grew, they often moved faster in their development than their support staff could keep up, let alone handle the backlog of previous product. Nothing has changed. Every new product announced, brought on more tentativeness of having quality and timely support from their "ongoing" customer-users.
Each time, MS would announce release of the next great 'thing', they would tout it as reliable, self-reliant, more customer centric, and more easily configured than the previous version. We all found that was not the case. We also knew that support=$$ paid out. (Several companies modeled their support pay schedules after MS.) Those support calls were fairly frequent (especially with small businesses who employed novice or unfamiliar users to the ever-changing technology).
Their one product that no one, including this author, thought would last and be the most stable product ever, was MS WinXP, following SP1. It became the de-facto MS product for business - stable for both network and daily computing. MS support still obtained notable profits from their support structure; however, the business and private sectors also finally had a solid platform to work from.
Slide up the time-chart to just prior to present day with products Win7, MS Office 2007 & 2010 (both 32 & 64 bit versions) with so many conflicts in installation, migration, co-operation of peripheral devices, operation, & recovery (to name just a few). Products that should work out of the box didn't.
MS Support heavily used the WWW and would wait silently for advanced/expert users, who would provide answers (work-arounds) through their daily usage of the products. MS support pages would actually use forums vs. their previously standard support pages to provide answers via "threads". Both standard & expert users were/are frustrated. Their expensive purchases (aside from the software which we all know included upgraded hardware) didn't work out of the box yet again.
Without trust, MS has nothing. And if that singular path does not improve, they are destined to become yet another Woolly Mammoth...
ANON1242905689517
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ANON1242905689517,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 6:10:54 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I will tell you plainly why Windows 8 sales have lagged. Have you tried to buy a new model Tablet PC with Windows 8 on it? Selection is non existent or very limited. There are NO NEW MODELS with anything like a 12 or 13 inch screen - in other words only media toys are available - where Microsoft is years late. MS is still king of laptops but THERE ARE NO NEW TABLET LAPTOPS
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
4/23/2013 | 6:35:01 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
You ain't gonna like the price of a 15" touch laptop. It will be $100-200 more than an equivalent non-touch laptop (20-40% in low-end product) and that will put a lot of folks off. Folks without the deep pockets (a la M$) to push a concept and buy market share have to make what people want to buy at a price they are willing to pay. I doubt Asus or Dell is willing to lose $100 a unit in hopes of buying future market share in an almost fully commoditized market.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 7:40:36 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
For all who keep asking, "Why would Microsoft do something so stupid as Windows 8? It defies Logic!" Let me explain. It goes something like this:

1. We third party software developers create hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue.
2. Normally, we get 100% of the value of a software package that we sell to you.
3. Microsoft decided that they were entitled to some of our revenue, 20-30% for Windows 8.
4. A few years ago, Microsoft decided that they would start charging a "third-party developer tax".
5. They fretted about of how to collect this tax without running a-foul of the US Department of Justice. They cannot simply declare that, to run on Windows, you have to give us 20-30%. That would be illegal.
6. They came with with a "brilliant" (their words) idea: they would create a new Windows, different from the old Windows, and force a tax on the new Windows. DOJ would not be able to say squat.
7. They were extremely concerned that users would not be willing to eat the Windows 8 dog food, so...
8. Instead of making boot-to-Metro default, but changeable to desktop, they decided to force Metro upon everyone.
9. They would use typical lies like saying that "They needed to converge PC's and tablets, yada.."
10. All the "Microsoft Account", lack of DVD-playback, lack of POP3 support, UEFI secure-boot lockout...all of this stuff fits into their "lock-the-customer-into-Metro" plan.

So, in a nutshell, it's not that Microsoft doesn't hear you. And it is not that Microsoft is unable to hire professional UI consultant. In this case, they are basically saying, *@*# our customers..we need that 20-30%, damnit.

I implore you to show them how stupid this stunt is, and who really controls the PC industry. Now get to work. :)
randomtask
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randomtask,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/22/2013 | 7:21:56 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
In the world of IT - things always change. I remember asking why Microsoft bothered to put the overhead of a GUI on the OS when we went from DOS to Windows 3.1. It was an improvement and we have learned to live with it. I remember asking why Microsoft came out with a file server that had a GUI on it when all you need is file management which can be done from a DOS like prompt - think Netware 3.1. I got used to the change and I will get used to this one. I find Windows 8 to be an improvement in some areas and some day I will probably learn to get used to it. I am not used to it now - my only exposure to it is on my Surface, which I like to use, but sometimes find awkward.
Manguan Da
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Manguan Da,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2013 | 7:48:52 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
ok
midmachine
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midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
4/23/2013 | 6:05:58 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
IS IT JUST ME? I am not going to get in the middle of this, I like the system and yes, the UI needs some tweaking. Some of the analogies made here are way off base and only show a bias against MS, no matter what they do. My real point in posting is...why is the font for our comments so much smaller than the text on the page. A little smaller to save space...okay...but I am going blind trying to read comments on Info Week unless I up the zoom level on the browser...just my 2 cents...anybody else notice this or have I finally gone over the edge?
foddermail
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foddermail,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 4:33:02 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
The entire purpose of Windows 8 is to extend the PC into a touch arena. If you have Windows 7, there is no reason to upgrade anything to Windows 8 unless you want touch. Microsoft knows. this. What did people just move off of to move to Windows 7? It was Windows XP released in 2001. SO now Microsoft has time to experiment and try something new. They did and I like it. I am buying a Surface Pro. What I am not doing is upgrading anything non-touch. I don't need to. Windows 7 kicks butt. So what is the problem? By the way, the IDC numbers don't count tablets or anything with a detachable keyboard. So basically they aren't accounting for the entire impact of Windows 8. Great reporting...
foddermail
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foddermail,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 4:38:42 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I use Windows 8 every day and it is fine on a desktop, but sorta missing the point. I cannot wait to permanently make my overly large laptop into a server and never carry it again as soon as my Surface Pro arrives. What Microsoft is obsoleting is the traditional laptop. I don't even think they are going after the consumer tablet market. There is really nothing wrong with their strategy. Metro was a good first salvo into reinventing the laptop, and now its time to iterate...
Snidely70448
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Snidely70448,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/29/2013 | 2:23:12 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Please. Give me back XP. After a dozen years the momsers finally got the bugs out, and they've f****ed around with Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8, none of which I've liked. MS wants to do tablets and smartphones? Good. Write a new OS for those things. Port 'em to laptops, but allow the people who want a desktop for work - you know, work? - to have a new computer that runs XP that they don't have to learn the changes in the new OS.
eminkler925
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eminkler925,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/3/2013 | 10:40:32 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Win 8 works fine on the SURFACE as is. However; on mouse driven laptops/desktops I feel the previous desktop icon format is more appropriate. In fact that is what I have done; setup the desktop the way I'm use to accessing apps. Deleted the Metro Icons.. A plus for WIn 8 is "UP AND READY TO GO ONCE YOU ENTERED YOUR PASSWORD". Plus in my case its the same password I use to access the internet; since I have an internet MSN account.


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