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8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
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randomtask
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randomtask,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/22/2013 | 7:21:56 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
In the world of IT - things always change. I remember asking why Microsoft bothered to put the overhead of a GUI on the OS when we went from DOS to Windows 3.1. It was an improvement and we have learned to live with it. I remember asking why Microsoft came out with a file server that had a GUI on it when all you need is file management which can be done from a DOS like prompt - think Netware 3.1. I got used to the change and I will get used to this one. I find Windows 8 to be an improvement in some areas and some day I will probably learn to get used to it. I am not used to it now - my only exposure to it is on my Surface, which I like to use, but sometimes find awkward.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/20/2013 | 6:02:29 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Exactly. A fact should be pointed out about the App Store. If you go back early 2012, you will see that Microsoft was pushing the App Store pretty hard. They were engage in psychological programming of their third-party developers (like me), using the word "App" no less than 11 times in a 68-word paragraph. At the time, I didn't think much of it. I figured..."They are hell-bent on getting us to write these so-called App's...not sure why."

Then I read the fine print.

Microsoft is so hell-bent on getting us to write "apps" because each time we sell an "app" they get 20-30% of the revenue from selling our "app". But our "apps" must be Metro "apps".

That leaves regular users. Metro apps cannot run on desktop, so Microsoft has intention of getting as many users away from the desktop as possible, and herding them toward Metro, where they can collect their 20-30%. When you do the math, its tens of billions of dollars in new revenue per year.

So that is the reason. It has nothing to do with ignorance, stupidity, lack of customer-feedback...(ok well stupid, yes)...it is greed and gambling. They gambled that we users were so sheepish and pliable, they would be able to muscle us all into Metro, whether we liked it or not.

Looks like they were wrong.
AsokAsus
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AsokAsus,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/20/2013 | 3:36:14 AM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Indeed, consistency is the hobgobblin of small minds. I for one can't believe the lack of innovation in the auto industry, for example. The darn steering wheel has been on cars, for, well lets see, almost since cars were invented. They really need to do something more innovative than that stupid steering wheel. I think a tiller on the floor that you bat back and forth with your two feet would be really cool because it is so new and different. And I'd replace that obsolete brake pedal with a knob on the steering wheel. That'd be cool because it's new too.And different. And finally a throttle rope hanging from the roof would be SO much cooler than the accelerator pedal, don't you think? And you know why? Yep, you got it. Because it would be new. And different.
Tom LaSusa
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Tom LaSusa,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 7:52:41 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Leo,

I've already asked you once, and I don't believe you replied. Please show us where we made this New Year's Resolution? I've looked through our articles and found nothing of the sort.

Regards
Tom LaSusa
InformationWeek
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 7:40:36 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
For all who keep asking, "Why would Microsoft do something so stupid as Windows 8? It defies Logic!" Let me explain. It goes something like this:

1. We third party software developers create hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue.
2. Normally, we get 100% of the value of a software package that we sell to you.
3. Microsoft decided that they were entitled to some of our revenue, 20-30% for Windows 8.
4. A few years ago, Microsoft decided that they would start charging a "third-party developer tax".
5. They fretted about of how to collect this tax without running a-foul of the US Department of Justice. They cannot simply declare that, to run on Windows, you have to give us 20-30%. That would be illegal.
6. They came with with a "brilliant" (their words) idea: they would create a new Windows, different from the old Windows, and force a tax on the new Windows. DOJ would not be able to say squat.
7. They were extremely concerned that users would not be willing to eat the Windows 8 dog food, so...
8. Instead of making boot-to-Metro default, but changeable to desktop, they decided to force Metro upon everyone.
9. They would use typical lies like saying that "They needed to converge PC's and tablets, yada.."
10. All the "Microsoft Account", lack of DVD-playback, lack of POP3 support, UEFI secure-boot lockout...all of this stuff fits into their "lock-the-customer-into-Metro" plan.

So, in a nutshell, it's not that Microsoft doesn't hear you. And it is not that Microsoft is unable to hire professional UI consultant. In this case, they are basically saying, *@*# our customers..we need that 20-30%, damnit.

I implore you to show them how stupid this stunt is, and who really controls the PC industry. Now get to work. :)
ANON1242905689517
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ANON1242905689517,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 6:10:54 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I will tell you plainly why Windows 8 sales have lagged. Have you tried to buy a new model Tablet PC with Windows 8 on it? Selection is non existent or very limited. There are NO NEW MODELS with anything like a 12 or 13 inch screen - in other words only media toys are available - where Microsoft is years late. MS is still king of laptops but THERE ARE NO NEW TABLET LAPTOPS
jsnapp863
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jsnapp863,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:51:19 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
Showing my age, I started in computers before Jobs & Gates even spoke. From the beginnings of MS, the compatibility issues abounded, as did support. Everyone in the data field put up with them, as it was "emerging technology".
As MS grew, they often moved faster in their development than their support staff could keep up, let alone handle the backlog of previous product. Nothing has changed. Every new product announced, brought on more tentativeness of having quality and timely support from their "ongoing" customer-users.
Each time, MS would announce release of the next great 'thing', they would tout it as reliable, self-reliant, more customer centric, and more easily configured than the previous version. We all found that was not the case. We also knew that support=$$ paid out. (Several companies modeled their support pay schedules after MS.) Those support calls were fairly frequent (especially with small businesses who employed novice or unfamiliar users to the ever-changing technology).
Their one product that no one, including this author, thought would last and be the most stable product ever, was MS WinXP, following SP1. It became the de-facto MS product for business - stable for both network and daily computing. MS support still obtained notable profits from their support structure; however, the business and private sectors also finally had a solid platform to work from.
Slide up the time-chart to just prior to present day with products Win7, MS Office 2007 & 2010 (both 32 & 64 bit versions) with so many conflicts in installation, migration, co-operation of peripheral devices, operation, & recovery (to name just a few). Products that should work out of the box didn't.
MS Support heavily used the WWW and would wait silently for advanced/expert users, who would provide answers (work-arounds) through their daily usage of the products. MS support pages would actually use forums vs. their previously standard support pages to provide answers via "threads". Both standard & expert users were/are frustrated. Their expensive purchases (aside from the software which we all know included upgraded hardware) didn't work out of the box yet again.
Without trust, MS has nothing. And if that singular path does not improve, they are destined to become yet another Woolly Mammoth...
NJ Mike
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NJ Mike,
User Rank: Strategist
4/19/2013 | 5:31:33 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
The last thing we need is for government to step in and do anything here. I don't want some un-elected bureaucrat deciding anything that effects my computer. If consumers walk away from Windows 8, either Microsoft will listen and change, or they will go the way of many other formerly large companies that couldn't keep up.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:22:02 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
It is now the second quarter of the new year.

Information Week only had one important New Year's Resolution this year. '"No Slide Show Articles with out a prominent 'View-as-one-page' link." How's that working out for you so far?

How many ties did you blow this in the first quarter?

When are you ever going to start respecting your readersl / clients / consumers ?
glenn817
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glenn817,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2013 | 5:16:37 PM
re: 8 Ways Microsoft Could Save Windows 8
I'm not really sure that is what W8 does, I think it just adds touch as an additional means of interfacing with a computer. Once AutoCAD is open, people can use their mouse or whatever they like. BUT I do envision a future where touch in places like Photoshop and Powerpoint for example can be greatly enhanced by touch - the problem is that neither the software nor the hardware is up to snuff in this regard. There are a lot of really great parts of W8 too...

But I agree, in theory, why not keep both the Modern UI and the Start menu? One reason might be the same reason why they made the Surface in the first place - hardware and software vendors may not optimize their products if they aren't forced to. I suspect strong MS's idea was for that reason....
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