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How To Be A CIO And A Woman
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Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2013 | 3:18:38 AM
re: How To Be A CIO And A Woman
==--

No, it's been my experience that the sexier I dress, the more people thank me for fixing their workstation, getting them a new one, etc.

I am not taken less seriously; I am quite sure I'm taken more seriously. When I speak up at software design meetings and code reviews, I noticed people (meaning "guys" at these meetings) looked more attentive when I don't look "frumpy," with "frumpy" meaning T-shirt and loose pants.

I'll admit I've never tried dressing like a man (expensive pinstripes, business suit with matching skirt, etc) or looking like a stern schoolteacher, but I don't want to. If I ever thought I had too, I'd find someplace less formal.

I believe that any negative treatment from people has been due to my being autistic and not my gender. I could definitely be wrong about that, as I can't read other people's minds very well.

I will also admit that I've only been in meetings with the president/owner/CEO at small businesses, so I guess I can't speak to the glass ceiling problem. But I've been "the computer chick" for medium-size businesses.

I've also been the IT manager for a large nonprofit, responsible (with my small staff) for HQ and 90 field offices, though it was in the days when IT wasn't very complex yet. I mainly ordered PCs, configured laptops, insured the supply of consumables, helped the worker bees fix stuff when they couldn't figure it out, did the specs for network connections in the new building, and made innovative improvements on my own authority (in my own domain of responsibility), which everybody universally loved.

So even though your mileage may vary, being female has only brought good things to me at work (to the extent that it's had any effect at all, and it may very well not have).

I did leave one job due to grotesque sexual harassment by my weirdo, spherical boss, but that was unrelated to my work.

--faye kane GÖÇ girl brain
http://tinyurl.com/kanescave
Dw@ll
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Dw@ll,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2013 | 4:40:52 PM
re: How To Be A CIO And A Woman
Great article ... readers may also be interested in this great article http://ow.ly/kzBgi
Mason Yu
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Mason Yu,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2013 | 8:19:58 PM
re: How To Be A CIO And A Woman
What counts in IT is gray matter and creativity, not what sex is about....
looking at 3D modeling or solving partial differential equations with Matlab
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
4/26/2013 | 6:07:39 PM
re: How To Be A CIO And A Woman
It was a powerful event I was glad to be at. One point that David Behen made is to not assume that men in IT leadership roles don't care about the issues women face in a work environment. Help them understand if they (we) are missing something, he said.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
4/26/2013 | 5:02:31 PM
re: How To Be A CIO And A Woman
Thanks for sharing the blog, Dana. It is always interesting to hear perspective from the trenches on being one of few women in the IT organization. It also points up there there is no one right answer on how to deal with situations like this. Your writer pushed through it with hard work, and persisted on her IT career path.
Deirdre Blake
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Deirdre Blake,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2013 | 3:01:50 PM
re: How To Be A CIO And A Woman
Love the headline tip o' the hat to Caitlin Moran, and I'm happy that this discussion is taking place. Kudos to the Michigan Council for Women in Technology.


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