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MOOCs: What University CIOs Really Think
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moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/3/2013 | 8:17:20 PM
re: MOOCs: What University CIOs Really Think
Online education does not have to be free, but by now a singe master's course costs well over 1,000$ at a run of the mill state university. That is totally insane! If for credit online courses are in the area of a few hundred bucks and on campus courses are a bit more expensive higher education will be way more affordable. The funny thing is, it is usually the other way around, online courses are more expensive than the on campus courses.
Robert McGuire
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Robert McGuire,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2013 | 3:09:51 AM
re: MOOCs: What University CIOs Really Think
I can lend some anecdotal evidence to the "promotion/publicity" argument for offering MOOCs. One of our reviewers who took the Wesleyan cinema course, who is from Greece, told me she hesitated to enroll because she had never heard of the school. It's not on a list she has of the best universities in the world. Now that she's taken the course, she know recognizes Wesleyan as one of the world's great teaching colleges.
sjacks982
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sjacks982,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2013 | 5:19:39 PM
re: MOOCs: What University CIOs Really Think
My experiences at larger Universities is that Full Professors may lecture, but Teaching Assistants (a way to pay Graduate students who otherwise work for free doing the professors research) do test proctoring etc. The Professors get a stipend from the University whether they "teach" in that quarter or not. Funny: one prof was gone for a few weeks and had TA set up a playback device at the podium in his place. Next "lecture" the students were replaced by recording devices aimed at the podium. Any different than an online course?
sjacks982
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sjacks982,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2013 | 5:50:05 PM
re: MOOCs: What University CIOs Really Think
Network Week (RIP) used to have a "centerfold" with network structure of major institutions: I remember Key Bank, Microsoft.com, UIUC, et al. My point is that a 3,000 student college is less impressive than talking about the network infrastructure of the city of Lodi, CA. I would be more impressed if IW showcased 30,000+ schools like UCLA, U of Washington, U of Utah, etc. Significant contributions to networking like Stanford (Arpanet, Sun, Cisco, et al), UCSB, UIUC (NCSA, Netscape/Mozilla is Mosaic clone), MIT (opencourseware, history of online games,etc), would be relevant. But Wesleyan? Lame of you.
ghsmith76
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ghsmith76,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 1:47:01 PM
re: MOOCs: What University CIOs Really Think
I also attended this CIO summit in San Diego and took away these same observations. All to confirm that MOOCs are and will be a disruptive force in higher education. My recent post about GT's partnership with Udacity and AT&T in Higher Ed Tech Talk is just another example of this. As CIO's we balance faculty fears with leadership ambitions as we mediate this discussion.


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