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Acer Reveals Windows 8 Hybrid Tablets
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AsokAsus
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AsokAsus,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2013 | 3:22:27 AM
re: Acer Reveals Windows 8 Hybrid Tablets
Sigh. Yet ANOTHER rebirth of the netbook, only this time sans keyboard and mouse.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2013 | 11:10:02 AM
re: Acer Reveals Windows 8 Hybrid Tablets
@rpasea, I submit you are actually the PERFECT candidate for Metro. 8-10 apps and nothing more. If you'll give Metro a spin and adequate to acclimate I think you'll find it's very friendly for this type of use. Your apps are right there and easy to get to, easier than pinning an app to the Task Bar in Win7.

That being said, you need to be prepared for XP death in <1 year. Sure, you could continue to run it, but vendor support will dry up very quickly after April 2014 and then you become a menace to the Internet with an OS that no longer gets security updates (IMHO, discontinued OS's and browsers should be blocked by all ISPs and websites). The fact is Win8 is more stable, faster, and secure than Win7 (and there's no comparison to Win XP SP3) and if you simply must have the Start Button, ClassicShell is free and VERY good. I do tend to agree that a touch screen isn't essential for a business, however. I just ordered my first Win8 Pro tablet, we'll see how that goes, but I'm betting the touch screen will be good for the Internet but not much else, but I deliberately did not order a keyboard with it to force myself to use Win8 as it was "intended". Time will tell.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/4/2013 | 8:22:19 AM
re: Acer Reveals Windows 8 Hybrid Tablets
Thanks for the comment, rpasea. You're right: Windows 7 and Windows XP are totally adequate for most business needs. Chances are, these desktop-centric operating systems and their legacy software will remain workplace institutions for a long time. Touch definitely has value in business/ work environments-- but it's value that's currently confined to specific verticals, rather than widely deployed across all enterprises. That will likely change, bit by bit-- we've got an article on the topic coming up, in fact.

But the point still remains: PCs are going to keep ruling the enterprise. That said, PCs' enterprise importance will never be quite what it was before. At one point, PCs were the center of the universe, with virtually 100% of the computing market among both consumers and businesses. That's no longer the case, and as next-gen tablets and other new devices work their way into business workflows and become endowed with new apps and capabilities, PCs will lose still more influence. To be clear, I'm talking about a drop from 100% share to something that's still insanely high. I'd be guessing if I tossed out a number-- but PCs will still be essential to businesses.

Nevertheless, if tablets and ultraportables own the consumer space and take over a small fraction of the enterprise, the result will still be a substantial shift in our computing culture. As our coverage has explored, the PC isn't dying, let alone dead. But it's also not the only big, strong kid on the block anymore.
rpasea
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rpasea,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2013 | 1:03:35 AM
re: Acer Reveals Windows 8 Hybrid Tablets
Touch screens are essential for phones and tablets but I just don't see the value in a business/work environment. XP and Win 7 suit our needs and we have absolutely no interest in going with a so called metro interface. Our staff need Office, Outlook, AutoCAD and a browser, nothing more. In fact, we block FB, Netflix and discourage personal email activity. A PC at home has a much different need than one at work.


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