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Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
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AnnoyedAnonymous
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AnnoyedAnonymous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/28/2013 | 10:35:30 AM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
How is this product any different from the plethora of other HDMI mini PCs that are already on the market? A bit late me thinks unless they have a management solution in a similar way to ChipPC's Excalibur management suite.
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
5/22/2013 | 1:42:16 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
Based on reader reactions, the Dell will have to market their new Bacon Matzo Balls very effectively to be a success..,... (;-)
Zman7
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Zman7,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2013 | 8:56:48 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
I don't know why Dell didn't jump to tablets and phones. These are ALL PCs and Dell could have made them as well as anyone.
Was there a bit of RIM syndrome going on??
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/21/2013 | 5:40:26 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
Based on our reader reactions, it looks like Dell will need to market this thing very effectively. Probably why they talk about selling to enterprises and schools - where its use cases can be controlled and limited such that the per-unit costs make sense - rather than to consumers.
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2013 | 5:34:43 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
Gee, the device is of negligible size. But the keyboard and mouse is as big as a full-sized tablet, which can do pretty much the same thing. And LOTS of public monitors/TVs don't have an accessible HDMI port, and often there's no easy way to switch to it if there is one. This sounds like a giant exercise in frustration to me...
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 5:09:15 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
I agree with all three comments posted so far: these PC-on-a-stick devices have been available from China for roughly $50. A good site to see just how available these devices are is here:

http://www.aliexpress.com/whol...

[Disclaimer: I have no interest in helping Ali-Express in any way, whatsoever.]

I have said it over 100 times now. All of the major OEM's that are selling hardware are missing a CRUCIAL opportunity here. Every single OS that is being sold in these mobile devices is locked-down in some way or another, especially Android.

We developers are the ones who make the "apps".

Right now, it is Royal P.I.T.A. to write native applications for mobile devices. Google is being dishonest when they claim that you can for Android. You can't. Not really. Same goes for iOS. Same goes for Ubuntu Phone. Same goes for Tizen (it appears, though they are very crafty at making the device seem open). And the same goes especially for WP8.

http://techcrunch.com/2010/09/...

If you are an OEM, and you want to blow this market out of the water, you need only do one thing: Start selling devices that are truly open, meaning that, the developer is not forced to code to some sandbox just to get his app onto the consumers machine.

I know some of you executive types have density that would make a black hole envious ... and probably think that the way it is, is "OK", but it is NOT!!!!

Open up the devices the way the PC was open for 20 years, and developers will push your product.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/21/2013 | 5:06:34 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
Good points-- and no, not a "big thing" but, as I suggested in my response to the above poster, an indication that Dell - so famous for its impersonal, commodity PCs - is thinking about computing differently these days. Though Opehlia already supports keyboards and mice, Dell is working on additional peripherals. Hopefully they'll find a way to overcome the touch issue, which, I agree, will dictate whether this is a semi-useful product for select groups, or something that has wider appeal.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/21/2013 | 4:56:21 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
I think you're right-- if Ophelia actually constituted the whole of Dell's plan. Ophelia might gain some fans, but it's certainly not going to fix Dell's problems on its own.

But as I said in the article, I think it's more of a "signal" that interesting ideas are brewing in some of the companies Dell acquired. Dell can't reinvent itself by buying its way to success-- its acquisitions need to show they can perform and innovate, post-merger. I think Dell's full PC plan also probably includes downsizing parts of their consumers business, continuing to gain Windows 7-based revenue through enterprise and institutional sales, and trying to catch up on the mobility scene with Windows 8-based tablets. Ophelia is only a piece.

But as your comment implies, these non-Ophelia efforts aren't going to generate rapid progress against the competition. Ophelia, in contrast to all those other avenues, represents something that's at least different and unique within the market. If that's a sign that Dell can begin leveraging its software IP - particularly its cloud and virtualization tech - then Ophelia is a silver lining in a week that was otherwise full of bleak news for the company.
ggiese87101
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ggiese87101,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 4:53:03 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
Android 4.x PC on a stick is already available for $50, has been for a while. Maybe Dell will do it better, don't know. But they better do a heck of an awesome job on it. Biggest problem is installing it on non-touch TVs and monitors means apps requiring touch or are best used with touch will not work well with a mouse/keyboard. That's the limitation of the sticks already out there. But for some apps it is an extremely good value. But I agree with other commenter, this won't be a big deal. Now if they threw them into big-screen TV boxes or monitor boxes for not much and had a way to monetize people's usage of the device (ads, app store with traditional keyboard/mouse apps, etc.), then it might become interesting, but still not the "next big thing"
jschmoe101
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jschmoe101,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 3:33:51 PM
re: Can Tiny Ophelia Cure Dell's Big PC Woes?
Meh. So, Dell's plan to save its business is to sell a <$100 PC on a USB stick rather than its servers that are tens of times as valuable, while the raft of Chinese companies selling similar units for 30-50% less has been available to consumers for more than a year? The PC business is tough and margins are low, but this seems more like wild desperation than a long-term business plan. I wish you luck, Dell.
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