Comments
Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
sdouty
50%
50%
sdouty,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2013 | 9:49:13 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
I'm a huge fan of Shell. It basically gave me back my old Windows 7 experience. I no longer have a need to wade through the Metro interface.
AustinIT
50%
50%
AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2013 | 12:45:24 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
It is NOT that the OS is "touch centric"... because it isn't. It is a dual interface OS that is designed to support the legacy desktop interface as well as implement a new UI that can be equally used on both a touch and non-touch screen and span a range of devices from phone to server using one code base.

Modern apps run on Win8 Phone, Win8RT, and Win8 while legacy apps run on Win8. The Phone OS has a bit more tweaking to do and then it will run the same RT apps as the other two flavors do. The core OS for phone is already Win8. That's the end game of unifying the platform. The user will get the same UI experience where they can start working on one device and finish on another with a seamless transition between them while in-app (with real time syncing). The framework is now in place... MS just needs a bit more time to tie it all together.
moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/23/2013 | 12:00:26 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
The landing area for the charms cannot be used by anything else because it is the landing zone for the charms. Showing a button in that spot will not take up any space that could be used otherwise. In return, it would make using the UI sooo much easier and sooo much more responsive.
Ramon S
50%
50%
Ramon S,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2013 | 11:40:21 AM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
I have the same experiences with Win8. Especially #2 makes it even more baffling that Microsoft thought it was a good idea to add a touch centric UI to Server 2012 and they even did only a half-baked job at that. I could understand that move if there would be one OS for all devices, but Microsoft has three: Win8, RT, and Phone. Of course, they each need their special applications that do not run on the other two versions. Who thought that this was a good idea?
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2013 | 7:15:17 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
Touch is for tablets only. I could NEVER see myself interacting with my desktop screen (or even my lap top screen) using touch. I don't want a smudged screen (I do CAD work) and be constantly cleaning it as I have to do on a tablet. The stupid OS should be smart enough to discern if it is being installed on a tablet or not. If not, then boot to the REAL desktop, not the infernal tile apps screen that we have absolutely no use for. And yeah, a REAL START button would not hurt, even though many have installed START8 or Classic Shell already.
tfarre
50%
50%
tfarre,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:48:48 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
I see your point, but when you say "loiter," I assume you don't know exactly where to click either. Can't see how a small icon on the taskbar would hurt.

On your 2nd point, who wants to put down the mouse to touch the screen? It's a complete waste of time and effort!
dsmith322
50%
50%
dsmith322,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 6:23:20 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
I had problems with this at first, but it was a very quick learning curve to have the cursor loiter in the bottom right of the screen to bring up the settings. I don't wan an icon taking up precious real estate now that I know how to do it!

[edit] Now that I re-read your post and see you have touchscreen, don't you just drag from the right? It would be even easier with a touch screen than with my mouse I would assume... [/edit]
mt_head
50%
50%
mt_head,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 5:02:02 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
Start8 gets lots of love, but Classic Shell (free, and installable as part of a bundle from Ninite) is pretty awesome too.
tfarre
50%
50%
tfarre,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 4:49:00 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
I'm in the same boat, have a desktop with Win8 and touchscreen. I use the desktop with mouse for work, touch for exploring the interface and fooling around.

One thing I find maddening: when in desktop mode and using the mouse, it isn't clear where to touch the mouse pointer to bring up the start, search and settings icons on the right. I know it's somewhere on the lower right-hand corner, but I can't easily locate where exactly to touch the pointer. Would it kill Microsoft to add an old fashioned (but useful) icon for this purpose?

Tom
ChrisMurphy
50%
50%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
5/21/2013 | 4:40:24 PM
re: Windows 8: 4 Things I've Learned
I've been using a standing desk most of the time for the past few months, and I've realized that while standing my desktop screen would be as easy to reach, and maybe more natural, than reaching for the mouse. I'm not using a touchscreen desktop at the moment, but I can see the appeal as I work standing most often. Not a mouse replacement, but I think touch would be an appealing add-on to my desktop.


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Government Oct. 20, 2014
Energy and weather agencies are busting long-held barriers to analyzing big data. Can the feds now get other government agencies into the movement?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.