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Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
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Tony A
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Tony A,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 5:14:14 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
"PCs have been around for forever and a day,.." You're funny. But don't IW authors have to be at least voting age - if not drinking age?
Steve Naidamast
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Steve Naidamast,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/31/2013 | 4:48:35 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
"I've heard from several readers in these fields
who've pointed out that heavy-duty CAD work just isn't suited for
tablets or phones, at least not yet."

ReallY !?!? Doing heavy duty CAD on a smart-phone !?!? "at least not yet" should be corrected to "and never will be..."

Let's get real here...

As for the "Start Button", if you want it, get one of the new free utilities or spend $5 on the one from StarDock...
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 4:48:16 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
I was almost scared off, but I took a retired XP and upgraded for $40 with the free Media Center Download and it brought it back from the dead.

After about 20 minutes I realized it was a slightly improved Windows 7 with a bolted on Modern Front End.

I then upgraded my production XP and now run my Win 8 and a Win 7 side by side. No real need for people to upgrade a Win 7
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 4:43:55 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Let's separate things. If you hate Windows 8, then you are probably an experienced Windows users who uses Desktop Programs and not apps.

Well, click on the Desktop Tile or boot directly with 8.1 then you are on an improved Windows 7. Many small improvements.

Take a look at Task Manager, Have a different background on each of two monitors. Have your task bar optionally appear on the bottom of both monitors and other small nice things that you will find.

Miss the Start Button Menu. See my post below and just remember a couple of things or go ahead and install a Start Button.

If you have Windows 7, should you upgrade? Probably not, not enough improvement to really be worth it. But if you have Vista or XP, then probably.

The upgrade to a retired XP of mine brought it back from the dead. Run the Suitability program first.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 4:39:36 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Not to mention the price of an upgrade from Win7 to Win8 was raised by 40% six weeks after release. I guess the reception was so poor M$ need to raise the price on the poor fools still willing to upgrade.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 4:35:21 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
"easier navigation for people using a mouse and keyboard", is what 90% of business PCs use and NOW your going to make it easier? That wasn't M$ first thought in releasing Win8? And you're shocked at the poor reception with less than 4% adoption of Win8 amount Win7 users?
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 4:30:40 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
I do like my Start Button/Menu but,

If you miss the Start Button, then you are an experienced Windows users who is going to be on the Desktop a lot.

1. The folder "File Explorer", automatically put on your lower task bar,
gives you most of the capability of the Start Button Menu. Just set
the default to "all folders" if you want.

2. The ability to pin programs is actually the Start Screen on the
Modern Front End or you can pin to the lower task bar on the Desktop or the Desktop
itself or mix and match.

3. The ability to look at all programs is a right click on the Modern Front End

4. Shutdown options can be accessed in various ways, but the three
fingered M/S salute (Ctl, Alt, Del) and press the power icon works in
all situations and gives you quick access to the Task Manager.

The Run Command can be found by mousing to the left corner on Desktop
(that left mousing ability goes away if you install Classic Shell, but
of course you then have a start button/menu) or Click on the Windows Key
+ R

Don't get me wrong, I installed the Classic Shell and got my Start
Button back because it is comfortable for me after all these years.
But, how to do without it can fit on a Post-It Note.
AsokAsus
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AsokAsus,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/30/2013 | 7:11:16 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
No restored Start Menu = Microsoft is lying though their teeth about
listening to their customers. If the restored Start Button just takes a
user back to Metro, Microsoft has pretty much just spit in the faces of
their users and has indicated that it no longer has any real interest
in remaining in business, because the outrage that will be engendered by
such a move will make the anger triggered by the original Start Menu
removal look trivial.

Potential customers are waiting to see if 8.1 shows Microsoft is
listening or not. If not, then the current stall out in PC sales will be
nothing compared to what's going to occur after a
poke-you-in-the-eye-with-a-stick 8.1 is released.

Given what's coming down the pike with 8.1 and Xbox One, Steve Ballmer seems absolutely determined to kill Microsoft.
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