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Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
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Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/31/2013 | 8:25:24 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Agreed. Mobile devices will never be useful for that sort of work-- though desktop computers are already starting to resemble, and sometimes even function as, giant tablets. That shift is form factor doesn't mean users will stop using a mouse and keyboard, but I think it shows that even users with specialized needs will soon find a variety of device types to choose from. And for users with general needs, the sky's the limit: for this group, the functionality a smartphone provides is about 80% of the functionality they'd use in a high-end PC. Tablets only narrow that gap.

This explosion in choice is, more than anything, what the slow PC market is really about. Tablets aren't going to take over all tasks anymore than desktop PCs are going to go extinct; rather, tablets are just a sign that the ways we define "computer" aren't adequate anymore.

The question for Microsoft is this: with so many device types out there, can Windows 8 successfully span so many sizes, form factors and use cases?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/31/2013 | 8:16:10 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Lots of good tips-- thanks for those. But you also raise an important point: are the people who dislike Windows 8 primarily desktop users? At least one recent study concluded that even Win8 tablet users have little use for Modern apps, which isn't conclusive-- but I think it reaffirms that Microsoft needs to more than restore the Start button. It's important that Microsoft avoid further alienating disgruntled desktop users-- but it's also important (arguably even more important, for the short term, given where most businesses are in their refresh cycles) that Windows 8 establish some BYOD/ consumer action. Some BYOD users will be driven by the chance to carry Office on a cheap tablet, so once the Haswell and Bay Trail tablets arrive, Win8 will make some gains no matter what. But to grow outside niche segments, Windows 8.1 needs more.

Michael Endler, IW Associate Editor
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:33:39 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
I haven't even used the crazy hierarchy since I can type the first few letters and get a list of programs (including the one I want). You have the same methodology in Win8, so I don't see the problem as anything but people clinging to the old, inefficient way of doing things.
I can do calculus with an abacus, but it doesn't mean it is better - and I probably shouldn't.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:31:38 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
To defend that statement, I am 41 and agree - PCs have been around since I was in middle school, which was "forever and a day" ago ;-)
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:21:44 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
People have always added third party programs to customize Windows. Many of those features that were popular from third parties were eventually added by M/S as standard.

One reason people go with M/S systems is the availability of third party solutions to customize the system which is not usually available with Apple systems.
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2013 | 7:18:45 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
I don't know if this qualifies but when you add a program it seems to automatically add tiles for all the sub programs, which I find nice.

For example when you add the program AnyDVD you also get tiles. You get one for the program, one for the Ripper, one for AnnyDVD System Information and one for the Image Ripper.

Another example would be HD Homerun, you also get tiles for The config, and setup and one for Quick TV.

I sometimes would install a program and not look and be aware of the programs that came with it, now it is automatically put on the Front End in Tiles. I find it helpful.

Of course people are going to complain about all those tiles, but the ones you don't want to see can be unpinned.

It seems hierarchical, in a way, to me.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 6:22:55 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
Great tips, but neither of one addresses the lack of having a hierarchical menu structure available that can be customized to quickly link to applications and any kind of document or web resource. There is no such thing on Metro and viewing all files and folders via File Explorer is quite far from a usable alternative.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 6:19:06 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
There are basically no users who use apps on desktops. Apps are of use for the limited capabilities of phones and tablets. Even a cheap standard desktop is beefy enough to run real programs so there is no need to bother with the very limited capabilities of apps. Aside from that, there are hardly any Win8 apps to begin with - another aspect that Microsoft just doesn't get.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 6:16:21 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
"As for the "Start Button", if you want it, get one of the new free utilities or spend $5 on the one from StarDock..."
Agreed...but why do customers have to go through extra trouble for that after spending quite a bit on Win8?
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2013 | 5:26:51 PM
re: Windows 8.1: Thanks For Listening, Microsoft
The button alone is useless! Microsoft did not listen to PC users at all, otherwise they would add the start menu back. Aside from looking hideous and having tiles that are just friggin huge Metro lacks any kind of hierarchical organizational scheme. That is what the start menu provides on as little space as possible. Especially with many applications installed using the start menu is quite more user friendly than the flat structure of Metro that requires half an hour of vertical scrolling.
Win8 is a flop and the lack of listening to users will cause 8.1 to flop even more. There is just no benefit or value in Win 8.
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