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Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
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HaroldCallahan
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HaroldCallahan,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/6/2013 | 3:10:15 PM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
I am also in favor of functional devices. However, I see no reason why a functional device has to be over 3 pounds. As much as I dislike Apple for other reasons (patent lawsuits), the Macbook Air shows that such a thing is possible. Why, oh why is there no decent 2.3 pound PC ultrabook?
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2013 | 2:32:09 PM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
If you can't hang it on your belt or stick it in your pocket, you're still carrying an extra 'thing' around. If I've got to carry an extra 'thing,' I'd rather it be more functional. Of course, once I get onto a device bigger than a phone, I'm primarily an information creator, not a consumer. If your a taker instead of a maker, that might change things.
HaroldCallahan
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HaroldCallahan,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/6/2013 | 1:59:56 PM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
Unfortunately, ultrabooks fall far short of the promise of only a "little" extra weight. The vast majority of ultrabooks are well over 3 pounds, with some imposters even weighing in at 4 or 5 pounds. That amount of bulk is just not attractive compared to an iPad, not to mention 7-inch tablets.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/4/2013 | 10:11:19 AM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
Intel statements about battery life improvement are quite bold at each iterations of products since Centrino times!
If they were accurate as bold, now we would have not less than a month battery life, just multiply the 3-4h of Banias models to 1,5X or 2X EACH time Intel announced a new generation... but unfortunately we are stuck on 3-4h for entry level to (optimistic) 6-8h for ultrabooks with new batteries and moderate usage.
Nowhere near the full weekend or full daily work of always on, media intensive freedom I enjoy on my iPad and on my Galaxy.
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
6/3/2013 | 6:00:19 PM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
Instant boot eliminates much of the 'cost' of firing up a laptop, and I expect sharp price reductions in the monetary cost of touchscreen ultrabooks over the next couple of years, despite the Microsoft tax.

Tablets are already too big to carry conveniently (not pocketable), so for many of us, a thin, light laptop will be a huge win over a tablet. A real keyboard, a powerful OS, and a useful array of ports more than make up for a little extra weight as long as there's no extra wait.
xenophonkc
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xenophonkc,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/3/2013 | 5:05:27 PM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
Hybrid is the natural next step of high end devices. Touchscreen ultrabook with detachable or twistable tablet/keyboard. Tablet mode for consumption, laptop mode for productivity - instant on either way. It's out there in some clunky forms today but not yet as ubiquitous as it will be as the tech and design improves.

Better yet for techies - multiboot to Windows, Android, Linux, etc. Apparently Intel CloverTrail+ will do this and may allow Intel to get back in the mobile game with WinDroid tablet hybrids.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
6/3/2013 | 4:33:18 PM
re: Ultrabooks Game Just Changed
Tablets may not lose ground, but it does seem like they'll get squeezed as smartphones get larger and faster and ultrabooks get more affordable and gain the advantages you've noted here.


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