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LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
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PaulH126
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PaulH126,
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1/20/2014 | 5:17:59 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
A local competitor has already lifted some of my website's phraseology onto his own and has just asked to connect on linkedin. My view is that I have nothing to learn from him but that he has something to gain from me. So, I refused his offer - largely on the gounds that his fairly overt plagiarism of my site leaves me with worries as to his ethics. 
PaulH126
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PaulH126,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/20/2014 | 5:17:56 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
A local competitor has already lifted some of my website's phraseology onto his own and has just asked to connect on linkedin. My view is that I have nothing to learn from him but that he has something to gain from me. So, I refused his offer - largely on the gounds that his fairly overt plagiarism of my site leaves me with worries as to his ethics. 
gkirk300
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gkirk300,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/13/2013 | 2:44:44 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
This is a crucial concern in my opinion and it comes up almost every day for me when I view my email. The question is what does connecting with someone we don't know and have no 1st/2nd/3rd person connections with do to our reputation which we work very hard to protect on LinkedIn. I think the answer is constantly changing for me. I am starting to think that kschuster3271 is correct that its about staying professional and honoring the task we have as professionals which is to help others connect to better opportunities. Our reputation isn't the only thing that is in jeopardy here. We are risking the possibilities that might not occur in the workplace if we choose to restrain LinkedIn's "lifeblood". Let's leave the more intense scrutiny to HR and be a part of LinkedIn's "life force".
kschuster3271
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kschuster3271,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/12/2013 | 6:53:07 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
Interestingly, Don Peppers has posted a Linkedin influencers article today entitled "How to find opportunities in your social network" and fits in nice with this piece.

Many associates find it interesting the someone in the people business, as I am, is not an "open net worker". They are surprised to hear, or see, that someone who has been on LinkedIn since the beginning usually only has between 12-1500 connections. I actually purge my connection list quarterly. The first to go are those who connect but do not share their connections. To me the purpose of connecting is to share. If you are going to ask to connect then you should also be sharing who you are connected with and not blocking them from your other connections. To me this is the "life blood" of LinkedIn, connecting.

If think the authors have gone a little over board regarding identity theft concern. Yes, it happens. It has always happened. It is just easier with the internet and people posting too much personal information. For me the word is professionalism. Keep your profile and posting professional and you will help to minimize your identity theft risk and increase your reputation on LinkedIn.
Cara Latham
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Cara Latham,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/10/2013 | 12:48:12 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
I have always been an open networker, as I find it can help you connect with like-minded people in your field whom you might never have met, as the article mentions. For example, I have connected with alumni from my college whom I never met in person or even knew during college, but ended up helping one of them obtain a position at my previous company because she was a very good fit.

Obviously, it is good to be selective, but I think there are still opportunities for you to maintain your desire to be an open networker and be smart about it. Lately, I have noticed the number of spam invitations has increased. But taking a few extra minutes to research the person, look at their profile, and determine their true intentions goes a long way to protect you.
icreatephx
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icreatephx,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2013 | 6:52:16 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
I don't connect with companies using a personal profile. They should know that it's against LinkedIn policy for entities to have personal profiles. I also don't connect with folks outside the U.S. that I don't know and have absolutely nothing in common with. I prefer to connect with local people as that's where my target market is. I will connect with non-local folks if they are an industry influencer or someone who provides valuable content.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
6/7/2013 | 5:39:38 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
My LinkedIn approach is to only connect with people I know, people who have introduced themselves via a mutual contact, or with whom I have had a longtime dialogue via social networks. I think your LinkedIn connections reflect upon you. Frankly I am surprised to hear the point of view that you should connect with people you don't know to expand your reach. I do that via Twitter, but I think of LinkedIn as closer to the vest.

Let's hear your approach.

Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
Jed Davis
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Jed Davis,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2013 | 5:22:57 PM
re: LinkedIn: When To Say No To Connecting
Timely article, I just received my first LinkedIn 419 scam, but with a decidedly "American" twist. I tend to be more of an open networker, due to the nature of my role, but I do make sure that they are either in my discipline, OR we have common contacts before accepting. Looks like I'll have to be more judicious on the first screen....


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