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Apple iOS7: What's Missing
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Bob Gill
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Bob Gill,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/12/2013 | 9:55:32 PM
re: Apple iOS7: What's Missing
Your NFC comment is very USA centric. In Japan and many other countries, no NFC = no sale. NFC is a mature, widely available tech in cell phones worldwide.

AirDrop is an Apple feature. Only 20% of smartphone people have an iPhone. I'll stick with Dropbox (or Skydrive) because the world isn't Apple.
bwalker970
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bwalker970,
User Rank: Strategist
6/12/2013 | 6:37:17 PM
re: Apple iOS7: What's Missing
Feeling a little defensive? NFC has always felt like a gimmick to me. Innovation isn't merely the addition of new features, it is the building of something useful. Apple does not typically introduce the newest technologies in their devices, but they are often the first to make new technology truly useful. After all, there were phones, portable digital assistants and touch screens before iPhone, but Apple was the first to put them together in an intuitive and thoughtful manner that provided a compelling and market-transforming product. Apple is usually conservative in their use of technology. Where they excel is in the integration of software, hardware and technology.

Both Apple and Google are developing deeper integration of features and situational awareness into their products. Thinking back to the fantasies of artificial intelligence research, the ultimate computer was one that could not only answer your questions, but figure out what you really meant to ask and anticipate your needs. In that realm, bullet points on a spec sheet are not as important as how everything works together.

Here is the WIkipedia article for Bluetooth Low Energy and a page from the Bluetooth SIG so you can look up the mobile devices that support the technology: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B... http://www.bluetooth.com/Pages...

I'll leave it to you to find the web page that describes "Bluetooth 4.0 Low-Power".
Cara Latham
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Cara Latham,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/12/2013 | 12:55:19 PM
re: Apple iOS7: What's Missing
Eric, I definitely agree that it is hard to "wow" smartphone users today. Maybe it's because we are used to having companies competing against each other to win us over in sales. That being said, I think that there is still room for more innovation, and a new "wow" feature is bound to hit the market soon, whether it is from Apple or one of its competitors.
CitizenT128
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CitizenT128,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/12/2013 | 1:29:44 AM
re: Apple iOS7: What's Missing
No NFC? No -Apple doesn't support every new or old gee-whiz feature. Several times in the past week I have had to Email information to colleagues who use iPhones. I can just use NFC with most others. This is one reason I will not own an overpriced (and over-valued, and very proprietary) Apple device. My Galaxy Note 2 can actually show three apps, not just two at once (one must be a video). Not something I use often, but when needed- it's nice to have!

Some of my friends who use Apple have been heard to say "This [problem] would not happen with an Apple.... And they're usually right, not because Apple is better, but because it
doesn't support the feature or function that they can't master.

The article mentioned Bluetooth 4.0 Low-Power. Apple doesn't support Low-Power mode. It's so...non-Apple. Apple has gone from innovation to rent-seeking.
bwalker970
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bwalker970,
User Rank: Strategist
6/11/2013 | 7:16:58 PM
re: Apple iOS7: What's Missing
Apple did not talk about Bluetooth LE at WWDC because it is already supported in the iPhone 4s and newer devices. Apple's answer to NFC was simply that they don't intend to support it. Unlike other device makers, Apple intentionally does not support every new gee-wiz feature. Whereas other phone makers may attempt to overwhelm its customers with the breadth of its features, Apple tends to focus on depth and usefulness.

Now that NFC has been in the market for a while, how useful is it, really? For transferring files, the iOS AirDrop feature appears to be much more useful, but perhaps, not as fun as trying to physically tap every phone in the room. As a payment system, NFC requires special readers which are generally not available whereas Passbook cards can be read with any optical scanner and works just fine for me at the local Starbucks or boarding a plane at the airport. One of the differences between Apple and Google is that Apple does not have to own everything to be successful. Google Wallet sounds more like a gimmick at this stage of the game and I am not sure where I could actually use it. Passbook can can simply store cards or tickets and make them available when needed and it already integrates with Square Payment System.


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