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MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
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moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
6/16/2013 | 12:41:08 AM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
I agree that MOOC increases accessibility, but that is where it ends. Unless the universities provide a certificate of taking that course it is a rather useless exercise that does not go beyond self-enlightenment (not dissing that at all).
What will drastically change higher education is making degree programs or more specifically tuition more affordable. These MOOC do not provide any college credits unless someone pays the 1,500$ per course...or whatever the rate is these days. The only thing that will change higher ed is taking the greed of institutions out. Tuition these days builds big football stadiums and buys astroturf and top notch campus landscaping, but also puts degrees out of reach for many. Cut tuition in half or even do away with tuition in STEM fields for any degree. THAT will revolutionize higher ed, but not some online courses.
ANON1243950556912
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ANON1243950556912,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/17/2013 | 2:04:38 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
Football tickets build football stadiums. Tuition pays for the faculty that makes students want to come to a particular university -- or take its courses online.
CloudEducation
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CloudEducation,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/17/2013 | 9:11:25 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
Kelly, this is a great article. Thank you.

Copyright laws are getting more out of date everyday.

We need to update all Copyright laws to match our 21st century information age.
CloudEducation
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CloudEducation,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/17/2013 | 10:34:02 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
I thought this was an interesting Statement:

"There are also legal concerns regarding laws that apply to traditional students but may not extend to course users. Such questions include whether or not MOOCs must be accessible to disabled individuals and whether they must refrain from discriminating against protected classes, Baer explained. These concerns stem from the free nature of MOOCs. Because they don't require federal financial aid to enroll, MOOCs may avoid the federal and state laws and regulations associated with federal financial aid -- laws that apply to most college students."

MOOCs are "by definition" more accessible to "disabled" individuals than teacher lead classes in bricks and motar universities. The ability to access information at the speed of light from virtually anywhere helps everyone in the network/learning community. Also, think of our seniors that have problems with mobility, but can be virtually equal on line and contribute their vast experience to new generations.

While, there are some "disabilities" that would make MOOCs less accessible, in general, I would think for most physical disabilities, and many emotional and/or cognitive disabilities are not disabilities at all in the Cloud.
bdengler
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bdengler,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/26/2013 | 8:19:37 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
Kelly, from a copyright perspective, the user that posts the content should generally continues to own the content and materials unless the MOOC program expressly provides that the user transfers ownership. What you will likely find is that the MOOC program will ask the users to give the site a license (most likely perpetual) to use the materials posted by a user. It makes sense, since the MOOC program needs permission to "copy" (store on its servers) and display materials posted by users for others to see on the site. I looked at Coursera's terms and indeed, Coursera points out the user owns her or his own material, and that the user grants Coursera a license to use it. I am an information technology attorney and I've written hundreds of terms in which this approach generally is taken by the site.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2013 | 1:13:29 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
Thanks, @ubm_techweb_disqus_sso_-97cd4fab67d406e2b060f37d53bf1320:disqus, I wasn't aware that most sites give that option to students and appreciate your clarification.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2013 | 1:14:06 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
Thanks, @ubm_techweb_disqus_sso_-97cd4fab67d406e2b060f37d53bf1320:disqus. I wasn't aware that most schools employ that option and appreciate your clarification.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2013 | 1:14:50 PM
re: MOOCs: Interesting Legal Territory Ahead
Thanks. I
wasn't aware that most schools employ that option and appreciate your
clarification.


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