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Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
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DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
6/20/2013 | 1:58:45 PM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
Not a single person in the country is against better health and happiness for all. But at $16 trillion in debt, I would expect that I would be experiencing nirvana every day. But I am not and we all just read how Coverlet is not.
I am no economist, but $16 trillion seems like a lot of money. That debt will be paid back eventually with worthless inflated future dollars. If I understand the Tea partiers beef correctly, it is that they don't believe the government is up to the challenge of refining the system. And eventually the weight of the debt will blow it up whether we want it to or not.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
6/19/2013 | 5:28:33 PM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
Extreme socialism has been tried and failed, but modern socialism as defined by the Tea Party is alive and well and living in countries with much less poverty, much better health and higher educational and happiness outcomes compared with the U.S. Certainly people game the system - no matter what system we put in place, someone will game it. I've seen people game the system of pulling numbers at the deli counter. But the answer isn't to blow up the system, it's to refine it, often using technology.
Coverlet
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Coverlet,
User Rank: Strategist
6/18/2013 | 1:43:43 AM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
One point for Google's marketing savvy. The formula is: figure out something positive that everyone's already doing and name it after yourself.

If Marissa Mayer has an ounce of Google still in her, she'll market Yahoo's extension of maternity leave as the Yahoo Happy Mommy. Tagline--- "Everyone else hates mothers. Not Yahoo!"
Coverlet
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Coverlet,
User Rank: Strategist
6/18/2013 | 1:25:16 AM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
I think of honesty as less an inspiration and more a habit. I'll stop before another nun reference flies out. I've hit my yearly quota.
Coverlet
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Coverlet,
User Rank: Strategist
6/18/2013 | 1:18:13 AM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
Dammit!! With a Yoda quote I should have ended.
Coverlet
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Coverlet,
User Rank: Strategist
6/18/2013 | 1:16:08 AM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
Great example. Made me think of Bruce Schneier's pieces on security theater.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
6/17/2013 | 9:55:50 PM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
This is a great challenge: "We all have the Google 20% time, but most of us just flush it down the business-as-usual toilet."
DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
6/17/2013 | 8:10:50 PM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
Coverlet, I completely agree with the idea that work should not suck as much as it does. There has got to be a better way. I pray that you find such a way. The cubicle drones (I am one of them) are in favor of your IT strategies and in favor of compassionate leadership and employee enrichment. The sticking point is that like government humanitarian programs, many cubicle dwellers would find ways to take advantage of these work enrichment programs. I know way too many perfectly healthy adults collecting disability checks from the government. These adults work under the table for pay, whilst getting disability checks from the govt. I am all for compassion. But how about verifying that the need is really there.

The global warming (GW) debate is not about warming or not. The debate is about man made causation or not. If government decides that man causes GW, then we will all end up buying carbon offsets from Al Gore, making him rich and me poor and the environment no better than it is.

The Tea Party
does not inert itself into every conversation. The Tea Party is simply everyday people opining that government $16 trillion debt is unhealthy for the country and places us ever closer to socialism. Socialism has been tried and proven to be a
failure. History is very clear about this.

Good article.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
6/17/2013 | 8:09:02 PM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
I have eaten those eggs you mention. A corollary lesson: Eggs do not seem to inspire honesty.

Colleagues who always have your back inspire honesty.

Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
6/17/2013 | 5:37:15 PM
re: Rules For Radical CIOs: Part 2
First let me point out a typo:

Eric R.'s last name is spelled the same as mine: Ries. Mind you, he's probably as used to misspellings and mispronunciations as I am.

Now for your concluding statement:

I agree that scale is a problem. We've become a nation of servants and are well on our way to becoming a world of servants. Few can hope to really be their own bosses, which tends to give us a lot less sympathy for our bosses than we would have if we had a realistic hope of filling their shoes. And those bosses who really are socipaths don't have to worry as much about their employees walking away as they would if it were easy for one to start one's own business.

But the big problems are:

1. Too many people have trained themselves to turn off their consciences when they become inconvenient (especially in the workplace). While we all do this to an extent, we don't have to and shouldn't rationalize it. It's a lot easier for evil to prevail if good people won't sacrifice to do the right thing.

2. We frequently forget that while we have no real control and only limited influence over the behavior of others, we have (or can have) a very high degree of control over our own actions. And we do have influence; mostly over our friends, families, and acquaintances, but we have it nonetheless. How we use that influence is up to us.

3, We forget that the struggle between good and evil mostly goes on within ourselves, not between competing groups or individuals. In nearly every conflict, there are good and bad people on all sides (and everything in between). We all have (at least figurative) angels and devils sitting our our shoulders trying to guide us in one way or the other. Our challenges are first to recognize which is which; then to follow our own better impulses consistently; then to encourage others to do the same.

And as long as we're talking Star Wars, we consider should consider a statement by Yoda in "The Phantom Menace": "Hard to see the dark side is". It's trivially easy to misjudge the motives of others, both good and bad (so be careful).
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