Comments
20 People Who Changed Tech: Steve Jobs
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
SkiMan01
50%
50%
SkiMan01,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/8/2013 | 7:05:45 PM
re: 20 People Who Changed Tech: Steve Jobs
I remember a presentation at bell Labs in 1970 on the global telephone network and the switching hierarchy. By that time, all of North America and Europe were equipped for direct dialing. There was a giant computer network dedicated to completing telepone calls. They were slices of bandwidth that could be used for anything, but most people used it for voice.
Years later I started using an early version of the internet that allowed me to download articles and papers from universities and laboratories around America and most of Canada. It was all FTP, and like the telephone network, you needed the exact address to even get to a directory of files. It looked like a big version of UNIX that bridged many computers. They promised that the internet thing would remain academic and pure.
It wasn't until prodigy and the web crawler that the first graphic image started appearing on screens. A few years laer a couple of guys came up with a fast search called google. They started using advertising. Then, Al Gore started chattering endlessly about the internet.
It started out as a pristine informaiton that stopped only at schools. libraries and research facilities. Since then, it has become an endlesss stream of billboards advertisements and a means of identity theft. Social media has turned it into one big rumor mill.
I guess the digital world mimics the physical world. No sooner do we get something nice than we try to monetize it and turn it into a piece of trash.
pwndecaf
50%
50%
pwndecaf,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2013 | 4:54:13 PM
re: 20 People Who Changed Tech: Steve Jobs
Even his excrement was too good to flush away. So if he wasn't rich, he'd just be a jerk. Is that too harsh? I don't know any more than I just read, but I wouldn't like him based on this article.
He probably wouldn't like me, either.


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.