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To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/10/2013 | 4:29:01 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
CYA has been a long-cherished strategy for some people. Does anyone have advice to share on how to manage the culture change as your shop becomes more and more automated?

Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2013 | 6:33:42 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
Laurianne, can you clarify your question? Do you mean that, as more systems become automated and people are "reskilled" (laid off perhaps?), how do you keep the right people plugged in?
At my company (large insurance org), the rule of thumb is that it takes 1 month to get a non-emergency change thru all of the change control committees. 1 month. There is this notion that somehow quality is enhanced as more and more people -- who do not have the slightest idea of what the change is about -- review the change for approval. I don't see the benefit.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/10/2013 | 7:01:21 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
I wasn't thinking of layoffs so much as IT process becoming more streamlined thanks to factors like virtualization and public cloud services. While you might have needed weeks and 3 signatures to spin up a new test environment in the past, you may need only hours and one signature now. That helps IT get to yes faster for people on the business side. A month for non-emergency change? Yikes. Must create friction when the business side is in a rush.
DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
8/15/2013 | 5:09:52 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
It's brutal. IT imposes this 1 month process onto itself. Then IT wonders why things take so long to develop and make production. DUH.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
7/10/2013 | 6:43:15 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
Govt apparently isn't alone in strangling IT in red tape
pyang3
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pyang3,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/15/2013 | 3:40:06 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
What this article does not take into account is that the CYA is usually done because top level management does have the balls to say that IT is correct in what it's doing. A culture shift cannot happen from IT, but must happen from the top down.
TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/15/2013 | 7:10:03 PM
re: To Break The IT Bottleneck, Stop Covering Your You-Know-What
CYA has a different meaning when considering application deployments/launches vs. changes to infrastructure. It's not hard to replace physical signatures on a piece of paper with clicks in a central approval app, or collaboration tool, so that deployments can be green-lit faster. But no one wants to be the one to say, after an incident for application A, "yes, I was making a change in the infrastructure. Didn't you know that?" After enough instances where the right hand does not know what the left hand is doing, and the business complains, you will end up with lots of CYA notifications for upcoming changes so that no one is surprised. Automation may not help that, unless it helps predict the "knock-on effects".


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