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Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
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JBottoms
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JBottoms,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2013 | 5:35:32 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
If only Steve Ballmer could be handed a pink slip!!. He has proven time and again that he lives in a fantasy world that is completely disconnected from the "Real World" ... and also has little to no personal understanding of the Windows XP or Windows 8.x operating systems and why these [desired] upgrades are not happening.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/10/2013 | 5:19:01 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
The leakage question is interesting. None of the analysts I talk to think that Microsoft - with its increasingly diversified revenue streams - is in major jeopardy as a company, but some of them think Windows is open to some degree of disruption. I'd be surprised if anything dramatic happened-- but you brought up the point. Francoman did as well, and it's been brought up brought a number of our readers before.

So, is being pushed off XP enough to make any of you consider Chrome, OS X or some other non-Microsoft alternative? Is the thought of switching to another platform more appealing that dealing with Windows 8? Again, I'd be surprised if anything dramatic happened, like OS X suddenly matching Windows 8's enterprise share. But even so, Windows 8 tablets haven't really impacted the iPad, which suggests Office might be less essential than some imagined. Along the same lines, the extent to which XP users might be tempted to defect from Windows is open to debate.
Francoman
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Francoman,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2013 | 5:08:01 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
In the world of Operating Systems, i don't understand Microsoft's motives for trying to force upgrade everyone away from XP. What? This is all about wringing more money out of the base. If Microsoft continues down this path they will drive away loyal customers to Chrome, Android with some of course moving to Win7.

Should Microsoft listen to its customer who are fine with XP and continue to support them. I say yes, listen to millions of your customers. Any Devices and Services Model will be principally internet based, so why not bring along XP?

Ballmer and senior Microsoft management have been presiding over one fiasco after another. Here comes another bad decision. "Let's chop off our XP customers because they should have migrated and they didn't so it's their own damn fault." Basically, Microsoft is saying screw these people let them migrate or find another OS.

Microsoft's flawed decisions will result in a Business Opportunity for someone.

Microsoft just does understand customer loyalty or how to manage it.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2013 | 4:57:30 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Looks like this problem amounts to MS trying to sell what a lot of their users don't want to buy. The traditional solution to this is to sell what people do want to buy (or increase demand by lowering prices).
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2013 | 4:55:44 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
The more Microsoft pushes on eliminating XP the more leakage to Apple and Google will be generated. If the consumer can figure out how to use Mac/iPad and Chromebook/Android to their better advantage over Windows so can corporations. When you think about it, its quite mind boggling how Microsoft managed to bungle everything its done when the direction/decisions where really quite simple to make and they didn't. What successes they have or continue to have are in spite of themselves.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/10/2013 | 4:50:04 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Your first two points, which are related to Mark5352010's comments below, cut to the heart of the matter. A lot of the migrations will require not only an OS upgrade but also a hardware refresh. Microsoft is counting on enterprise device sales to drive Win8 market share by a significant amount in 2014. This was clear in remarks at TechEd, and also, to a less prominent extent, at Build.

Much has been made of Win8's disastrous holiday season last year, but a bigger test will come in this hardware refresh. How many businesses will go for Windows 7 PCs? How many will go for Windows 8, and within this group, how many will use 8.1's boot-to-desktop feature to basically shut down the Modern UI? How many business users will use a Windows 8 tablet instead of an iPad?

A lot of businesses will upgrade from XP to some other Microsoft platform-- so 2014 will see a lot of Windows installations, of some kind or another, no matter what. But the ways these installations breakdown will be the big story, and one of the measuring sticks by which Steve Ballmer's reportedly-imminent reorg will be judged.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2013 | 4:49:33 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
As long as the reorg doesn't include out placement services for Ballmer, Microsoft will continue to struggle going forward. All the issues you identify and more lay at Ballmer's feet.
BGREENE292
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BGREENE292,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2013 | 4:46:00 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Microsoft is America's official predatory monopoly and never has kept customer interests as its first priority.

"Innovation" with Microsoft is not a feature, but another bug. The company more often than not has lagged the curve, and caught up by buying up smaller competitors-- or bullying them, and putting them out of business.

XP stands as the one Microsoft product with nearly universal acceptance. Yet, on closer examination, XP is not so much a glowing credit to Microsoft energy and development, but to the dogged efforts of millions of unpaid / paying Microsoft beta testers-- the end users / customers who pay Microsoft $100 per seat for the privilege of finding bugs and security holes in its software.

After 12 years, it is likely such an effort would yield results. And we should expect users to be satisfied with the product they helped refine into the standard environment they have deployed through their offices.

So, what does Microsoft want to do, now? In line with its monopolistic tendencies, Microsoft once again demonstrates it could care less that 40 percent of its customer base has invested a great deal of infrastructure in XP. Instead, Microsoft is concerned about its cash flow, and true to form, wants to poison the XP environment in order to make W8 or W9 seem better.

Lost on Microsoft is the idea of offering an actual incentive to upgrade / migrate-- with the rare exception of its $40 W8 upgrade offer last year.

In any case, most XP users already know a little secret-- Microsoft never has offered significant support for the majority of offices and homes in which XP runs daily. Instead, the IT staff-- bless 'em all-- is what keeps corporate Windows desktops as safe and secure as they have been, so far. With a properly layered malware defense, most users and offices can continue well beyond the April 14, 2014 expiration of Microsoft support.
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2013 | 4:40:28 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
The problem for MS is that XP is superior in many ways to 7 and 8 for corporate support teams. 7 and 8 are great at the end-user level but supporting them is much more difficult than XP. Compare injecting custom NIC drivers into WAIK versus ghosting a gold XP image. Compare using sysprep to update the default user profile to XP's simple file-based "Default User." Compare the tools for bulk deletion of user profiles - oh wait, there aren't any for 7/8.
Then there is the cost - not just in os but in hardware. We use mostly Dell GX620's, they run XP just fine but Dell doesn't support 7 (or 8) on them, forcing either a replacement of most of the hardware or making the decision to standardize on something the vendor does not support.
proberts551
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proberts551,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2013 | 4:34:42 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
MicrosoftG«÷s Problem.. 40% of computers still run Windows XP.

1. Most of the XP Computers will
not run Windows 7 very well, if at all.
2. Likely none will run Windows 8
3. Why would People who are used
to Windows XP want to change to a touch screen interface? No, They will not.
4. People that occasionally use a
computer to pay bills on line, or do banking on line, are not going to want to
make an investment in a new computer. This is especially true in a rotten world economy.
5. No one in their right mind is going to purchase Windows 8 so that they can spend time retraining themselves on how to use their computer.

6. Has Microsoft ever heard the saying G«£Keep it
simple stupid!G«•
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