Comments
Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Midnight
50%
50%
Midnight,
User Rank: Guru
8/9/2013 | 11:55:52 AM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
I believe Microsoft is missing an essential marketing point that is being put right in front of them. The XP look, feel, manageability, and enterprise has become their most successful trademark. As XP was basically co-developed with the target market, (ok pretty much the entire windows user market) to do a write-off on this intangible asset is mind numbingly baffling.
Can somethings "under the hood" be upgraded or improved? Of course! The market would even be willing to pay a moderate fee for targeted code feature upgrade packs that can be classed by target function. Think locked-down high security pack, a IPV6 stack upgrade, a 64-bit enterprise release or even stripped down loads for low resource systems (competing nicely with Chrome OS.) There are massive opportunity for a new round of profits just by listening to the customers like in the past. Oh, and they need to fire the entire new batch of marketing staff and UI designers (especially the ones they stole from Apple) because they obviously don't know the successful strategies from the absolute bombs.

Microsoft.. (if you are reading this and a really hope you are) a bit of history, MS won the desktop wars by giving business what they wanted first, then people took the machines home to move projects forward they didn't have time to deal with during business hours. Once the machine was in the home, the family started to abuse i... I mean Use It. The migration is work-to-home, not the other way around. Do I need to remind you of MS Bob or Millennium edition? Tools before toys is what the market wants and truly needs. Touchscreens are wonderful, but do have limited application in the real world. (Although my geek heart really wants one, I don't really need it so not worth the cost.)

---End Rant---
BGREENE292
50%
50%
BGREENE292,
User Rank: Strategist
7/12/2013 | 8:21:53 AM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Thanks for that. As Windows imposes ever greater demands on hardware, recessionary budgets sag under the accumulating burden. For most offices and individual users, Linux offers a completely viable alternative to the Microsoft Windows treadmill.

In my own office, Linux applications operate on a par with their Windows equivalents, but at only a modest hardware requirement. I can repurpose machines that do not work on W7 or W8, and have a fully responsive system again. Anticipated difficulty finding drivers has not materialized.

Robolinux seems a good prospect, although with most VMs, available memory remains a critical hurdle to acceptable performance. As things stand now, I am content with the cost savings and restored performance of conventional (formerly Windows) machines.
OtherJimDonahue
50%
50%
OtherJimDonahue,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/11/2013 | 2:33:22 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
I must admit: I only moved to Win 7 from XP last year, when my old laptop died.

Jim Donahue
Managing Editor
InformationWeek
Ramon S
50%
50%
Ramon S,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/11/2013 | 11:57:05 AM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Actually, it was and is working quite well. It is the same as Server 2003 64 bit with an XP UI slapped on top and some of the desktop specific features turned on. I use it on a regular basis and it never caused me any grief.
JohnM587
50%
50%
JohnM587,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2013 | 11:35:08 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
I am an IT consultant and have many Corporate Customers who have told me they just cannot afford the huge cost of upgrading their Windows XP which still works just fine to Windows 7 or 8

So I found a perfect solution for them before Windows XP expires. It is a new commercially available Linux operating system that runs all Windows applications and programs sandboxed inside Linux, making XP and also Windows 7 100% immune to all viruses and malware, requiring no future security updates or any anti virus anti malware software. They do this by saving all windows data to drive e which is the Linux partition and they have a one click Windows VM restore so it impossible to get a virus or malware.

It is so economical and bulletproof that I have already successfully deployed hundreds of these installs in the last 3months alone.

This 3D operating system called Robolinux installs an XP 32 or 64 bit VM in just one click Then you load your licensed XP disk into the VM, but that was easy for my Customers to do.

Check out Robolinux if you cannot afford to upgrade.
Lord_Beavis
50%
50%
Lord_Beavis,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2013 | 7:32:27 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
"1. Most of the XP Computers will not run Windows 7 very well, if at all." - But they run Linux just fine.

"2. Likely none will run Windows 8" - I read this as "Likely no one..." Only if my company issued laptop has it on it.

"3. Why would People who are used to Windows XP want to change to a touch screen interface? No, They will not." - Touch screens are great for simple things, but data entry and programming aren't simple things. Unless they themselves become touch centric.

"4. People that occasionally use a computer to pay bills on line, or do banking on line, are not going to want to make an investment in a new computer. This is especially true in a rotten world economy." - This should all be done on Linux system or a Linux live disc image.

"5. No one in their right mind is going to purchase Windows 8 so that
they can spend time retraining themselves on how to use their computer." - And this is where my Linux argument hits a snag. While it is different, some of the desktop environments offer enough of an XP feel that most folks wouldn't notice much change.

"6. Has Microsoft ever heard the saying GǣKeep it
simple stupid!Gǥ" - Microsoft and simple are oxymorons, unless you are referring to Ballmer, he is a bit simple. As for stupid, well...
CTBCo
50%
50%
CTBCo,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2013 | 7:00:49 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
I will be upgrading my XP machines to Win7 where practical the rest will go to Linux. There will be no downgrades to Win8 and when M$ goes to all cloud subscription I will be done with M$.
zman58
50%
50%
zman58,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2013 | 6:56:07 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
That is simply because they did not have the customer's best interests in mind and did not commit the necessary resources to make it a success. They don't want it to fly and they do have monopolized single source control over it.

There is no reason they could not continue to offer support for XP on a contractual basis, yearly subscription for a small fee. That in itself could be simply contracted out to another firm--perhaps offshored.

There is also no good reason they could not offer an XP desktop on the newer versions of their OS.

Greed will continue to prevent them from delivering what customers actually want. They would rather force the sales of new systems and services onto their customer base--like it or not, because it generates healthy revenue for them. They gotta have that revenue, or else--like a drug addict.

From the customer perspective, this is exactly the kind of treatment you agree with and condone when you check the "i agree" check box on the EULA.

If you are not happy with the way you are treated in the long run, then don't agree to the EULAs. Otherwise, there is nothing to argue about.
elcaab
50%
50%
elcaab,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2013 | 5:50:55 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
Microsoft did offer Windows XP in a 64-bit version. It was nasty and cranky.
rbrowning442
50%
50%
rbrowning442,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2013 | 5:35:39 PM
re: Microsoft Preaches XP Conversion
I don't get it? 40% of your users are ready to buy a product that you are doing simple maintenance on. Sell it!!! You don't even need to advertise. If I had 40% of my users wanting to buy my old version, I would sell it in a second. Hey MS, want to see a huge boost in revenue, offer XP in a 64 bit version.
Page 1 / 3   >   >>


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July 22, 2014
Sophisticated attacks demand real-time risk management and continuous monitoring. Here's how federal agencies are meeting that challenge.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.