Comments
Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
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dericktownsend
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dericktownsend,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/30/2013 | 5:50:59 PM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
The future of cloud is hybrid and multi-vendor. Knowing this, it will be quite some time before a cloud oligarchy emerges, especially as enterprises seek ways to effectively manage security, governance, and compliance to scale. At the end of the day, cloud computing canG«÷t provide much value without policy enforced governance compliance and security in addition to automation. Until enterprises get serious about managing hybrid cloud governance they will not realize the true benefits and no oligarchy will change that. For more: http://www.servicemesh.com/res...
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
7/24/2013 | 12:31:58 AM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
I'm adding a comment on Joe Weinman, Telx senior VP and author, cited in this piece. It comes from 451 Research's Owen Rogers, "Joe Weinman's hotel analogy excellently
communicated my view of the future cloud (or at least IaaS) world. I believe a hotel analogy for IaaS is far better than the old electricity consumption analogy, in fact I used such an analogy in a couple of open-access reports published last month on cloud pricing." Owen Rogers
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/19/2013 | 9:01:40 PM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
All the big established vendors shot past as the cloud infrastructure market. They saw commodity and wanted to start up the stack, I suspect. Amazon saw cloud infrastructure was what buyers wanted.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
7/18/2013 | 4:24:46 PM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
451 Research's Owen Rogers in his comment below suggests Google might have put misplaced emphasis on PaaS with App Engine, instead of going straight to Compute Engine. I agree. But why did it do that? It's heart clearly wasn't in competing for the infrastructure as a service market market at the start. It did for cloud users what was good for its own developers, and not a lot more. It was slow to supplement its preferred Python with a second language, Java. So is Google's heart in it now? Google answers yes, but serious cloud users appear to be taking a wait and see how much more Google does before they commit to it. Google can accomplish what it chooses to in cloud computing -- it's an undisputed innovator in the field -- but even so, cloud users are trying to be sure they know Google's mind is made up after seeing periodically that its changed it. Charlie Babcock
Owen Rogers
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Owen Rogers,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/18/2013 | 2:16:13 PM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
I wonder if Google initially focussed its cloud efforts on PaaS (App Engine) and SaaS (Gmail, Google Docs), hoping to attract a high volume of greenfield enterprises seeking easily-implemented applications, thereby providing Google with a high degree of lock-in. Perhaps the PaaS market didn't live up to expectations (therefore not delivering the volume or lock-in) and so Google were forced into trying to "steal the show" back from AWS with the introduction of Compute Engine.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/18/2013 | 12:23:38 PM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
Excellent point about cloud being "more than one thing" -- the SaaS, PaaS and IaaS businesses are very different from each other, even though some vendors play in more than one segment, and the approaches are widely varied. Everyone is trying to figure this out as they go.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
7/17/2013 | 10:08:51 PM
re: Cloud Oligarchy? Not Even Close
Microsoft would qualify as a cloud oligarch if you could tell how much of its infrastructure was devoted to IaaS versus Office 365, Bing, Sharepoint and various other entrenched, Windows-related services. Applications of the future that will run in the cloud are not necessarily being developed with Microsoft technologies. On the contrary, they show a distinct prejudice toward employing open source... IBM would qualify as a cloud oligarch if it were truly devoted to the commodity, x86 market but a huge part of the company is still devoted to producing the last chip architecture, Power, which competes with x86. That doesn't mean IBM consultants aren't smart enough to figure out how to help many enterprises implement various forms of cloud computing. It just means half the company is competing with cloud and the other half supporting it. Future cloud oligarch? Maybe, but I doubt it. By rights, Google ought to be a cloud oligarch. And it may be one day. But it isn't yet. Anybody care to explain to me why?


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