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Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
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SarK0Y
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SarK0Y,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/25/2013 | 3:32:03 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
here we can point out key factors of XP's longevity.

1. New processors get focused on multithreading.

1.1. So old applications have zero speed-up on them. frankly, they could run even slower.

1.2. R&D of new apps takes more time & money.

1.3. Performance of multithreading code is very hardware-dependent. + software collision issues could affect speed as well.

2. Power efficient processors are more vulnerable to EM noise.

3. to move onto new hardware/software is very cause of losses for businesses up to bankruptcy.

4. Security issue of old software mainly has been a fearmongering: well-opted network is quite solid against the most of cyber threats.
Birdlives
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Birdlives,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/25/2013 | 3:40:31 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
Because of their myopic and money hungry view, Microsoft will make more enemies and open the door to other OS's.
If they could start a subscription program so that XP users could still

receive support for, lets say, $10.00 a month and If there are 2 million users that is $20 million a month or almost $250,000,000
a year.
As with our politicians, it is to simple an idea and therefore will never be implemented. Microsoft is opening the door for others to sell their systems and maybe they will be better that MS.
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 4:43:17 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
They will hang on as long as they can. When they start finding that it is not to their advantage or safe, they will change.

Lack of support by Microsoft is only the start of it. There will be lack of support from their third parties and that is when they will make the change.

The good news is that Windows 7 is not a jarring change for them. I ran a Win 7 and Win XP system side by side for a long time.

Also, after a while, when all the Win 8 haters settle down, they will realize that with a couple of changes in defaults and remembering a couple of things that will fit on a Post it note. They don't need the Start Button/Menu or they can just add Classic Shell.

I now run a Win 7 and Win 8 system side by side, both with dual monitors and I never see the bolted on Modern Front End unless I press a key on my keyboard. Who knows, the front end might even be useful someday. Right now I just store my less used programs in tiles so I can easily find them.

The two systems run identically and I am never shot back to the front end. Before upgrading an old XP, run the MS program that checks to see that everything is compatible.

Windows 8 is a slightly improved, slightly faster Windows 7 with a few new features that I find useful, especially for a dual monitor environment.

By the way, because I was scared but the upgrade was only $40 at the time, I first upgraded a old retired XP and it brought it back from the dead. A friend of mine now uses it everyday.
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 4:49:29 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
No company that I am aware of supports their products like MS has for XP. It has been an incredible long time of support. Also, they give you an upgrade path.

I am not an avid fan of MS. I have had most of the O/S since DOS and have learned the Microsoft Salute and used it often over the years much to my dismay (Ctl Alt Del).

I also paid MS to fix my Vista by having to buy Windows 7. So I am not a fanboy, but Windows 7 and Windows 8 are a solid O/S. XP, although good, was a little flaky for me and not as solid as Win 7.
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 4:55:15 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
I have found less software crashes on Win 7 than XP with more opportunity to kill the stuck program.

I upgraded an old retired XP to Win 8 and the upgrade brought it back from the dead.

I have run an XP and Win 7 system side by side for a long time and now have a Win7 and Win 8 running side by side. These are the two most solid Operating Systems that MS has put out.

Most people deciding not to upgrade do not write their own code. Your thoughts on coding might be correct or you could just go back to Poke and Peek when you code.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 4:59:23 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
Did that old motherboard support the new "bios" uefi? If not, how did Win 8 install on it? Thanks.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2013 | 5:03:40 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
As Microsoft abandons XP, so will customers abandon Microsoft. I'm still running XP with IE8. IE 9 and 10 are not available on XP. As I run into more and more sites that don't support IE8 I've moved to Chrome and Firefox instead. Same will happen with the OS, looking at Chromebook and iMac.
midmachine
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midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 5:06:08 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
Really? Use Chrome OS for productivity applications? Hardly.....
remmeler
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remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 5:50:08 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
It was a skinny first generation dual core but I have known of many older motherboards being successfully used in a Windows 8 upgrade.

I did download the win 8 upgrade software on a 64 bit system and put it on flash drive so I had my XP 32 upgraded to an Win 8 64.

I did not check to see if it is using UEFI but I think the motherboard is capable. I don't know if it is a requirement of Windows 8. I found two different references when I googled it.

'I have a non-UEFI based laptop perfectly running the developer preview'
and
"You don't lose any features of note on non-UEFI systems besides some boot speed optimizations, and of course Secure Boot."

I always suggest people run the MS program that checks the system to be upgraded.
midmachine
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midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2013 | 6:11:06 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
If I understand it correctly, UEFI is primarily for secure boot. I installed WIN8 for a giggle on a Dell laptop that was 10 years old. It ran beautifully, no driver issues and it was really fast.
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