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Death By Hacking: Tomorrow's IT Worry?
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jaysimmons
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jaysimmons,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/13/2013 | 4:29:03 AM
re: Death By Hacking: Tomorrow's IT Worry?
ItG«÷s interesting to read about this other aspect of hacking and not only about the protection of patient health information and patient demographic information. I really hadnG«÷t given it much thought before but this is actually kind of scary. The thought that a hacker, or anyone wishing harm upon somebody else, could essentially remotely hack into a machine and provide lethal doses is very scary. It makes you skeptical of the machines that are there to supposedly save your life.

Jay Simmons
Information Week Contributor
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
8/7/2013 | 8:53:35 PM
re: Death By Hacking: Tomorrow's IT Worry?
Should get interesting a few years from now when car thieves discover how to pirate driverless cars with little more than a savvy mobile app.
Gadgety
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Gadgety,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/5/2013 | 3:28:50 PM
re: Death By Hacking: Tomorrow's IT Worry?
An acquaintance of mine went through a heart transplant. Post surgery there was trouble with the technology in an external box and after weeks of hassles, with untrained nurses who had no idea of what was wrong, finally this guy opened up the electronics and rewired them when no one was around! Who knows what would have happened had he not hacked it...


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