Comments
What Steve Jobs Was, And Wasn't
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
herman_munster
50%
50%
herman_munster,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2012 | 5:58:13 PM
re: What Steve Jobs Was, And Wasn't
Haha no, I've never been much of a fan of Jobs. I dont mean to suggest that I disliked him, only to suggest that he was a person of little consequence on my life (despite being a long term Apple user up until they released OS X).

Jobs was a great salesman, that's for sure.

Out of curiosity, any of you seen The Pirates of Silicon Valley?
JR Chat
50%
50%
JR Chat,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2011 | 8:37:55 PM
re: What Steve Jobs Was, And Wasn't
I found the article interesting, but my question is: Did Howard know Jobs as an insider, or as an outsider looking in? What Jobs accomplished speaks for itself as an innovater and as a man!
TreeInMyCube
50%
50%
TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2011 | 7:02:19 PM
re: What Steve Jobs Was, And Wasn't
I'd like more insight on "so early Apple products were weak where Jobs was weak." Are you thinking of the hard ceiling of 512KB RAM in the original Mac? Or something else?

Perhaps more importantly ... how did the brilliant people at Apple influence the *later* Apple products, so that they were less weak where Steve was weak? Everyone has weaknesses, after all, including Edison, Ford, Ben Franklin. How are the later products different from the early products?
ghelton950
50%
50%
ghelton950,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2011 | 5:54:14 PM
re: What Steve Jobs Was, And Wasn't
A very accurate assessment of Steve Jobs. But I'd modify the assertion of "Jobs actually never believed in teams or groups or collaboration. " He valued his teams and put a lot of personal energy into building great ones. What Steve did NOT buy into was the notion that any team's consensus on matters of risk and taste was superior to his own gut instinct. Good thing his gut instincts were the best in the history of the tech business. Without him, Apple won't be nearly as successful. The teams he leaves behind are highly respectable, and there are many brilliant individuals still at Apple. But Steve's departure means there is no one to say, "I know I'm right and I'm making my decision, regardless of how many disagree with it." Steve was one of the tiny number of corporate leaders who ever deserved that perogative.
belenbaasr2n
50%
50%
belenbaasr2n,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2011 | 5:52:07 PM
re: What Steve Jobs Was, And Wasn't
What made the Apple products IS sweating things like the screws inside the Mac. Kudos Steve for attention to details! Only a real product guy understands that.

Also, don't totally agree with the comment "Jobs actually never believed in teams or groups or collaboration." Steve believed in the brilliance that small, highly motivated teams could accomplish, provided with the right leadership (which was usually Steve himself). Gates called him a world-class motivator of people. You don't become that strictly out of fear or with an intrinsic disdain for working with (teams of) people. They may have been small teams (relatively speaking), but teams none-the-less. And he was brilliant at leading, motivating the product key teams he led.



The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.