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IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
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D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
8/22/2013 | 5:29:00 PM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
Sounds like a shot across the bow of any IBM employee (or ex-employee) who might otherwise be inclined to add their two cents here. That's my personal view, anyway.
Barry Graham
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Barry Graham,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/16/2013 | 3:39:19 AM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
You base your report on the word of someone who signed an agreement saying they wouldn't divulge confidential information and then goes and does just that? If IBM were a country this person would be seeking political asylum somewhere else by now. These are my own personal views.
Andrew Binstock
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Andrew Binstock,
User Rank: Author
8/15/2013 | 5:38:41 PM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
Agreed. This is a problem for all hardware vendors, including HP, Dell. Unsurprisingly, none of these companies has been able to gain traction with their cloud alternatives. However, there is time still time for new entrants into the market. In this regard, I expect IBM and HP, with their legions of IT consultants to have the inside edge, certainly vs. Dell.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Author
8/15/2013 | 5:26:32 PM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
IBM lags other vendors in certain areas of cloud computing and has a need to stretch a point or two. But we could apply the yardstick of exaggerated cloud revenues to many companies; Oracle, for example, springs readily to mind. Perhaps the SEC should investigate the NIST definition of cloud computing. It would find that it describes several new ways of distributing compute cycles that don't necessarily have a lot in common. One of them, the private cloud, is found in many enterprise data centers. I believe some of IBM's server sales can be categorized as private cloud implementations. How many? I don't know. Nor am I holding my breath until the SEC audits all the claimed cloud customers for fealty to the standard. Charlie Babcock
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
8/15/2013 | 5:01:17 PM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
20-year policy of staying out of the enterprise applications business didn't set it up well for taking apps into the cloud. With SaaS, it's all about the apps, not the infrastructure and middleware behind the scenes. On IaaS, IBM's middleware and infrastructure portfolio still needs more "cloudiness."
ibmcloudhahaha
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ibmcloudhahaha,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 4:14:40 PM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
The transition would have been doable if not for the promised straight line profit growth as outlined in EPS roadmap 2015
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
8/15/2013 | 3:59:38 PM
re: IBM's Cloud Business: Ex-Employee Divulges Shortfalls
IBM's in a bit of a quandary. Cloud is one of the fastest-growing markets, so it wants to be a leader there, but not if that push eats away at its current, higher-margin system businesses. As enterprise apps move into the cloud, requiring less of IBM's middleware and application consulting/integration services, perhaps it needs to get into that business in a bigger way.


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