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Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
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Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/21/2013 | 7:49:59 AM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
and that is why burying the desktop after the metro and officially calling it legacy scared all users and developers with common sense.
at the end of the day we will have ms either firing ballmer and keeping providing dominant desktop computing platform, or ms keeping ballmer, pc market collapsing, and people doing stuff on mostly non wintel tablets (and osx) through backends mostly on not wintel servers, with ms being the thirs smartphone company on the ay to join blackberry fate.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/21/2013 | 7:44:41 AM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
Interestingly enough, smb sales force are a very active area of transition from pc to taclets after w8 release, but not toward w8! I'm seeing a lot of smb going to android or ipad because all the outcome of windows 8 fuss for their was plainly "windows is dead".
Quite uncanningly, w8 has failed where it was meant to triumph, hordes of white collars are now accustomed to android and ios and the "me too" absurd move from ms has only accelerated the idea windows is no longer needed, even in smb.
As for what i can see smb replacement rate is very high now if you count every white collar now has a non wintel device alongside an ageing pc, and that there aren't, in hundreds smb i can see, ANY plan to buy w8 machines to replace xp ones.
xp decommissioning will be ms armageddon in its smb stronghold.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
8/20/2013 | 8:19:10 PM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
I expect that will change before too long, after Adobe Photoshop loses its lock on the market.
Onyemobi Anyiwo
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Onyemobi Anyiwo,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/20/2013 | 7:06:57 PM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
I also imagine how difficult programming would be if you used a tablet rather than a laptop.
elleno
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elleno,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/20/2013 | 7:00:36 PM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
Common sense at last. I use my tablet for reading, surfing the web, looking up info, running apps, but for proper work - writing a letter to a client, analyzing a spreadsheet or dealing with email in business - nothing beats a PC.

Business are not swapping out PCs any time soon. And nor are consumers who do more than consume information.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/20/2013 | 6:36:10 PM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
I also imagine how difficult programming would be if you used a tablet rather than a laptop.
GBARRINGTON196
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GBARRINGTON196,
User Rank: Strategist
8/20/2013 | 4:42:45 PM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
You CAN'T operate a digital darkroom with a tablet. You can do cutsie pie edits for upload to Facebook, but you can't do serious work.
OtherJimDonahue
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OtherJimDonahue,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/20/2013 | 2:12:40 PM
re: Are PCs Dead? Not For SMBs
"Eventually, the same factors that currently
affect PC sales -- product maturity, marketplace density, extended
replacement cycles and, yes, competition from new technologies -- will
catch up to tablets, too."

Yup, this exactly. PCs won't be dead for a long, long time. (As popular as they were? Well, no. But far from dead.)


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