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Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
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AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/24/2013 | 3:30:35 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
The problem with WinPhone is that (a) Microsoft has always had a tough time marketing anything to the GP, and (b) the retail guys never push WinPhone. Walk into any AT&T, Best Buy, etc. and inquire about WinPhone. Nine times out of ten they will try and steer you to iPhone or an Android device. For Microsoft, who needs enemies when you have friends like that?
dbtinc
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dbtinc,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/24/2013 | 1:09:24 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
To the vast majority of users does that really matter?
dbtinc
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dbtinc,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/24/2013 | 1:08:42 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
Isn't one of the problems is that WinPhone is one phone's nobody really wants?
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
8/24/2013 | 12:40:25 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
Best is to ditch Windows Phone and focus on other things. Microsoft is late to the game and needs to sink billions into the smartphone offerings for years to come just to catch up with Google and Apple. Microsoft should buy BlackBerry for their patent portfolio, merge it with Nokia, and then let that group work on what is now Windows Phone. That way Microsoft can focus on things where they are good at.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
8/23/2013 | 7:19:26 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
At a government IT forum in Washington, the Navy's CIO Terry Halverson acknowledged that government workers are likely to continue being a three form-factor tech user: Desk/laptop (for creation), tablet (for consumption) and smartphones (for mobile convenience). Windows 8 held the promise to deliver on all three but clearly hasn't caught fire. That's why the smartphone question is an interesting one here.
jsheldon920
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jsheldon920,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/23/2013 | 6:26:48 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
"Same goes for processor support. WP8 allows only for two-core processors, while many of the leading Android phones are jumping to four and in some cases eight cores. (Not that Windows Phone has much of a performance problem; it is very light on its feet.) This could help WP's gaming cred."
WP8 is based on the NT kernel which in theory can support up to 64 cores. Android needs 4 cores just to operate at the same level as WP8.
dlessard611
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dlessard611,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/23/2013 | 6:00:12 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
As a WP8 user I have trouble finding others that have one. I often wonder why since it is a superb platform. I also have an Android device (Nexus 7) and using it feels a bit boring compared to Windows Phone. The hardware tech specs are normally what columnists and editors focus on, but I don't see it that way. I'm an software IT guy, so specs are a part of life, but good software covers up for poor hardware anyday.
Each time I show someone my Nokia WP8 they are really impressed with the look and feel and how snappy the OS is. The problem is they never heard of it. I'm not crazy about the branding, it's obvoiusly not that effective but the OS speaks for itself. It's just fun to use.
I've had the hard core Android guys ask "there is no file explorer, how can that be?" I have yet to find a need to explore files on this device. It's a use case designed system, performs as it should. Of course there are things I don't like and they need to be fixed but the "gaps" in OS capability are only for those few that worry about it, and they worry about it just to make a point.
A new leader might help a better ad campain. I'm sure this will be a main focus.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
8/23/2013 | 5:56:05 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
I don't think the number of apps will change the situation. Windows Phone suffers from not being meaningfully different than the devices offered by two market leaders. Microsoft has to change the perception that buying a Windows Phone is like buying a Beta videotape player when everyone is going VHS.
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