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Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
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rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2013 | 11:07:57 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
I completely agree. For two years I used a MBP for mobile development and that track pad is unbelievably superior to the Win-world offerings. I don't recall it ever getting confused as to what I wanted it to do. Contrast that with my current, year-old Windows laptop track pad that is constantly confusing whether or not it's being touched or the quantity of fingers I'm using.

Often I just have to stop touching it and wait 5-10 seconds while it recalibrates. Sometimes I have to touch it with my whole palm or 3-4 fingers and wait 5-10, then lift and wait another 5-10. One time it was so confused I had to power down the laptop and restart it. It must be REALLY hard to make a great track pad because outside the MBP, this is the best one I've had. Several laptops ago the track pads were so bad that I much-preferred the eraser sick (HP used to offer both).
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2013 | 9:17:49 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
As it so happens, there was a report in July that said Intel and Microsoft were working on something to make Windows trackpads better. Here's hoping!
Bob Gill
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Bob Gill,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/27/2013 | 9:11:50 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
I'm certainly an MS guy, but I agree the MacBook's trackpad is far superior to any other pad out there.

I hadn't used a modern MacBook and then last year with my niece going off to college, she asked me to setup her new MacBook Pro and misc. I still don't think that much of Macs, but that trackpad was awesome.

Hey Windows device makers, where's the trackpad love?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2013 | 7:14:42 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
Yeah, possibly, though I think Dell might sell more of the non-touch Windows 7 configuration that it does any of the others. That seems to be the trend with XP migrations so far.

Still, during the presentation, someone said, "Whether you use touch once a month or every day, you'll be glad it's there." I think that's true. Sometimes, after using my Surface Pro, I find myself reaching up toward the screen of my Lenovo ThinkPad--so clearly, I must like the touch aspect, if I've conditioned myself to absentmindedly swipe at non-touch laptop screens.

Still, a lot of "touch" functionality is built into the MacBook Air's trackpad, which wipes the earth with the stuff a lot of Windows OEMs put out there. It's not the same as having a true touchscreen, but if "touch" functions matter, it somewhat narrows the gap.
Bob Gill
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Bob Gill,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/27/2013 | 6:48:43 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
Touch.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2013 | 6:46:50 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
Well, Dell would tell you that its computers are much more secure and IT-friendly. If a company already uses KACE products, that might be true, since the Latitudes hook right in. And depending on the operation, Dell's support and security software might be worthwhile.

But yeah, I've heard from people at both Forrester and VMware that OS X adoption in the enterprise is up lately. It's not up by a huge amount or anything-- but it's significant that it's growing, given all the other disruptions in the PC market. The MacBook Air is attractive to a lot people-- and not just consumers.
Alex Kane Rudansky
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Alex Kane Rudansky,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2013 | 6:28:55 PM
re: Dell Updates Business Ultrabooks, Laptops
So why a Latitude Series 7000 as opposed to a Macbook Air, if they're both around the same price?


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