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Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
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cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
9/12/2013 | 8:15:52 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Microsoft is trying to grow up as a PaaS provider. In some ways, PaaS represents the most mature thinking inside Microsoft. It's not chasing after other people's customers (a la touch screens) and it knows its business value. See Mark Russinovich remarks here.
jemison288
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jemison288,
User Rank: Moderator
9/7/2013 | 12:57:38 AM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Yes, although I put those in a separate category ("Proprietary PaaS") and generally view them as a bad idea, unless you're getting something from the proprietary aspect. (e.g., PropertyBase, which leverages Salesforce's brand and contacts).
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
9/5/2013 | 4:29:44 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Wouldn't Salesforce Force.com have a similar integrated stack advantage, at least for the apps that fit within their framework?
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
9/5/2013 | 12:33:55 AM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Joe is talking knowledgeably about where software responsibility lies (or doesn't lie) in the cloud, an issue that's not going away. It will become paramount as production systems move toward being hosted by cloud service providers. The cloud has to be a much more standard environment than the typical enterprise data center. Cloud providers other than Microsoft have a shot at this, but Microsoft has an inherent advantage when it comes to a standardized and well-maintained platform as a service. It's going to show in the long run.
jemison288
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jemison288,
User Rank: Moderator
9/4/2013 | 11:42:48 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
I'm actually making both points: I'm saying that (a) there isn't any PaaS provider (other than Microsoft) who will take responsibility today, and (b) I have a hard time believing that any PaaS provider is actually capable of doing so, because they don't develop the software in question (and if they don't control it, how could they take responsibility for it?)
jemison288
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jemison288,
User Rank: Moderator
9/4/2013 | 11:41:20 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
The point about DreamHost doesn't have anything to do with commoditization--it has to do with only being able to fulfill the bottom end of the market.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
9/4/2013 | 10:23:50 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Re: taking responsibility for the platform, my question is whether the issue is technical or contractual. Does it really need to be a single stack, or just a PaaS provider willing to take responsibility for making the pieces fit together?
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/4/2013 | 8:51:12 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
To say that PaaS vendors are destined to become the DreamHosts of tomorrow is a given: Commoditization happens over time. PaaS vendors will either figure out ways to add value (and maintain margins) or they will be made obsolete by the inevitable march of technology.
jemison288
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jemison288,
User Rank: Moderator
9/4/2013 | 4:51:33 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Putting applications in containers doesn't eliminate the problem of ownership over patching.
jemison288
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jemison288,
User Rank: Moderator
9/4/2013 | 4:49:49 PM
re: Microsoft Is The Apple Of PaaS
Definitely good points here. My perspective is that, with something like Heroku, there is *no* ownership of stack components from a patch perspective. It's just left hanging in the breeze. So my point is just that if there is a walled garden, the vendor has to own the components, and so that is at least theoretically better. But, as I say in the piece, Microsoft can definitely still screw up Azure.
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