Comments
Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
jaysimmons
50%
50%
jaysimmons,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2013 | 11:59:01 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
I was thinking the same thing. Getting your product ONC certified for MU Attestation could be an even bigger pain than trying to modify existing products. Couple that with the potential lack of interoperability with other systems and things start getting messy. I do like the fact that you can tailor your product from start to finish to fit your exact needs though.

Jay Simmons
Information Week Contributor
ChrisMurphy
50%
50%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
9/6/2013 | 4:24:02 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
Another pain point here is integration and data interoperability, and that pushes people toward off the shelf and single-vendor options. My hunch is that regulatory pressure likewise pushes people toward off the shelf options. These outfits are bucking the tide.
Alex Kane Rudansky
50%
50%
Alex Kane Rudansky,
User Rank: Author
9/4/2013 | 9:50:22 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
Landmark told me they don't receive much (if any) federal funding to meet MU standards because they are a group of long term acute care hospitals. That might explain it.
Alex Kane Rudansky
50%
50%
Alex Kane Rudansky,
User Rank: Author
9/4/2013 | 9:46:30 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
I think cost is a big factor here, too. It's expensive to buy into those off the shelf options, let alone customize them. Great point about regulatory pain - a question I will be pursuing!
fpoggio600
50%
50%
fpoggio600,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/4/2013 | 8:31:27 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
Based on a quick look at the ONC Certified product list I could not find Chartpad or Landmark (as the vendor) listed as a certified product. That means it cannot be used to meet MU Attestation. Developing your own system is one thing, getting the feds to certifiy it is another.
Frank Poggio
THe Kelzon Group
kelzongroup.com
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
9/4/2013 | 8:04:24 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
Alex, I wonder how this fits in with the regulation pain that plagues healthcare CIOs. Less pain to make homegrown solution meet regulatory needs than customize off the shelf option?
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
9/4/2013 | 4:09:34 PM
re: Why Hospitals Still Build Their Own Health IT
I wonder how many hospital IT pros would say following this path is a mistake.


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July14, 2014
Our new survey shows growing demand, flat budgets, and CIOs looking to cloud providers -- not to offload services, but to steal ideas.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join InformationWeek’s Lorna Garey and Mike Healey, president of Yeoman Technology Group, an engineering and research firm focused on maximizing technology investments, to discuss the right way to go digital.
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.