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10 Smartwatch Features We Want
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Becca L
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Becca L,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/24/2013 | 10:58:04 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
I do like your list. Prior to reading it I really did think smartwatches would fizzle out in the blink of an eye, but now I'm not so sure. Medical sensor applications could really be the selling point here.

This reminds me of some kid spy movie - never saw it but I remember from the commercials - a girl has a crafty watch that can do just about anything a kid spy would need to save the world. As they're falling down a big hole - falling - falling -falling - the boy turns to the girl and asks how long it's been. She says, "I don't know, my watch doesn't tell time"
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/9/2013 | 8:55:22 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
I would argue that a smartphone is more about the phone than anything else. Why else would people put up with $70+ mobile subscription fees if not for telephony? You can get a WiFi-capable iPod touch if you just want the computing aspect of a smartphone and it will cost a lot less.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
9/8/2013 | 11:50:01 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
==-
Typical sales disaster that the computer people are blind to because they're all excited by techno gimmicks: a "smart" watch that does stuff nobody needs and doesn't tell you what time it is. I guess I have to wear a "stupid" watch on my other wrist.

It reminds me of the Metro interface. When will designers start thinking from the user's point of view instead of their own?

This WOULD sell:
Make one with a teeny little mass spectrometer. It analyzes your sweat and changes the watch face to yellow when you're sexually aroused. And red when you're very aroused.

You'd only need to make the women's style because it would always show infrared color on men. I wouldn't need one for the same reason.

When the price drops to $3 like everything else with a computer in it, hand them out to girls at the door of the bar and give them a free drink if they wear it.

-faye kane G÷« girl brain
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
9/7/2013 | 12:40:33 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
#3 is interesting and I wonder how well that patent will pan out as there is plenty of prior art. And the idea is not new either, it is used on high end mechanical watches for quite some time.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Author
9/6/2013 | 9:00:10 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
I like this list. And I wouldn't underestimate the number of time related applications that might be found on a watch with smarts. It's not only about knowing where the hour hand is. Given my present location, how much longer to my destination, given present traffic conditions? Push a (soft) button and find out. Time plus GPS is a powerful combination. It would be a small screen surface, unless the smart watch had two wings that could fold out to triple the screen size. Users might laboriously input data, such as "airport" on a destination list, with a stylus and small keyboard, then work from list selection while on the go.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
9/6/2013 | 8:44:02 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
My bet is that after the laughter dies down about why we don't need a 4th screen (desktop, tablet, smartphone, smart watch) the smart watch will quickly surprise us by becoming a watching device, not a watch, that serves as a uber sensor, keeping track of our health, our interactions with other sensors, and who knows what else. Look at the investor interest of companies like Sensoria sensor-filled socks that track your activity, stride, speed, distance, calories and most importantly how your foot lands on the ground. Clearly, the watch is just the beginning of the next wave of sensor mania.
ditto1224
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ditto1224,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/6/2013 | 7:14:29 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
While you raise some interesting points, i find it even more interesting that you take issue with the term "Smart Watch" because telling time is not the primary function you would buy this for. You couldn't be more wrong in this perspective and your analogy of the laptop completely misses the point. The concept of a smart watch requiring the main feature to be the time component is like a Smart Phone serving more as a phone than anything else (while anyone who has one will educate you in your understanding that the phone feature is likely the least used feature).

Calling it a smart watch is all about marketing, not about function. Call it a smart watch and immediately ANYONE and EVERYONE will understand it to be a wrist worn device that has "smart" capabilities much like the smart phone in their pocket/purse. Call it something else and most novice tech users may walk right past it or not give an online article a second look.

Smart product managers and marketing executives understand K.I.S.S. (because it works). Keep It Simple Stupid.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/6/2013 | 6:01:05 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
Good list. I think the sensors and medical application points could be a big deal. I wouldn't even be surprised, once someone gets the interface right, if that sort of technology leads to meaningful and measurable improvements in the users' health.

Our bodies produce a lot of data, but most of us rely on whatever content is captured during a single annual physical. With a perpetual stream of health data, people could not only feel encouraged to keep exercising, but also become aware of developing problems at earlier stages. Of course it could also inspire all kinds of hypochondria, just like WebMD has, convincing people with the common cold that they actually have the plague. But I think the upside is much higher.

Again, someone has to get the interface right-- and I don't think Samsung is particularly close, at this point. But once someone does, this kind of wearable device could appeal to a pretty broad market-- young, fitness-oriented people; older people who need to monitor their health; etc. Could have a market that substantially overlaps the smartphone market but that is nonetheless different in several important ways.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/6/2013 | 5:06:18 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
I wonder if there is a way to implement intuitive voice controls. Voice interaction is still new enough that I don't always feel confident I know what to ask. I think I'd use Siri more if I were sure of the proper syntax to phrase everything.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
9/6/2013 | 4:55:40 PM
re: 10 Smartwatch Features We Want
Really intuitive voice controls seem essential. Can you do enough smart things by tapping on that tiny space?
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