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Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
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aditshar
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aditshar,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/13/2013 | 11:48:00 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
I read blog in linkedin yesterday, wherein
author reminded me of IBM when they were struggling for survival in the
early 90s, Bill Gates advised its new CEO, Louis Gerstner Jr., to
dismantle the IBM empire and create a smaller and more aggressive
company, I guess same prescription should work for MS today. As a part
of Nokia i was little optimistic about the MS& Nokia deal, keeping fact in mind
that Nokia and MS both were suffering through bad phase, For Nokia,
there is an opportunity to now to pursue a broader agenda of technology
development and licensing.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Moderator
9/12/2013 | 6:55:54 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Nothing wrong with a unified experience if it's done right, but the reception Windows 8 has gotten to date would suggest that this one wasn't.

Truly successful companies serve their customers instead of trying to dictate to them.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Moderator
9/12/2013 | 6:51:10 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
MS has called its pitchmen "evangelists" for many years, so nothing new there. And MS-managers have been choking on their own arrogance throughout the Ballmer years even though there is much less reason to than there was when Gates was in charge ("where else are you going to go?"). I had thought MS had learned some very valuable lessons in the aftermath of the Vista debacle, but apparently the very successful Windows 7 was seen as a strategic retreat rather than a necessary course correction.

All of the above is perfectly fine with me, but I'm a Linux user happy to see a particularly obnoxious monopoly crumble. MS shareholders, employees, and partners, on the other hand, should be very concerned.
JLONERO8255
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JLONERO8255,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 4:19:24 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
WhatG«÷s wrong with one operating system fits all. Yes, Windows can have both a G«ˇMetroG«÷ interface and a desktop interface. But, the OS just needs to know where to place them. Desktop or notebook computers are best suited for the desktop interface. An IPad device (or surface) and a smart phone are better suited for the Metro interface. And, both Metro and desktop interfaces are different G«£user experiencesG«• in the same operating system. An advantage is that the user can switch user interfaces on the fly if he chooses. Try that with an IPad or a Mac Book.

Even Apple gives the desktop/notebook user a different UI from the IPad and IPhone. So, Metro and the Windows Desktop are different. Now with Windows 8.1, the desktop interface is just like Windows 7. And, the desktop now includes touch screen. So you donG«÷t need to use a mouse nor the touch pad. Can make life much easier with more options.

Therefore, to keep things simple, one operating system with multiple user interfaces. You can use the same tools, methods, and settings to tweak your desktop interface as you can for your Metro interface. That can make life much easier for those not-so-computer-geeks. Soon, Microsoft will allow the user to create his/her own custom G«£userG«• interface. Scary (sarcasm intended).
Bob124
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Bob124,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 1:11:53 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Microsoft employee? Microsoft Stack?
TDERENTHAL8066
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TDERENTHAL8066,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 12:42:14 PM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Can we all quit crying about Win 8.x on the desktop, already? I use VS2012, Office 2013, Office 365, every brand of browser, manage servers at data centers in 3 different states, and, get ready for it... my Win 8.1 machine boots directly to the desktop, and looks, feels and works like my desktop from Win 8 which evolved from my Win 7 desktop, which evolved slightly from my old XP, which was begat by Win 98, which was begat by Win 95, whose father was Win 3.x.
Your IT will build an image for your desktop machines that will more or less duplicate your old desktop. Deal!
Also, can we quit with the prognostications about the death/near-death of MS.
Now, get back to work!
britnat
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britnat,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 11:05:48 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Good reporting, Kevin. Hits the nails on their heads. In a way, Microsoft's present attitude reminds me of that shown by the IBM chief priests - back in the day when Microsoft was still a twinkle in Bill's eye. IBM - huge corporation - virtual monopoly (they thought) - and within a few years they were shedding hundreds of thousands of employees - and were never quite the same again. Sure - they didn't do bust - but they must be kicking themselves over giving Bill Gates the niche they could have had all to themselves.

In this case - Microsoft have a significant niche - and are driving their loyal customers away. Everywhere we go - die hard Microsoft customers are talking Linux. Or Mac. These are not IT specialists - just business people, who till now were absolutely reluctant to even think of abandoning Windows. Now - they're not only thinking it - it's happening. We reckon it will spread, and once something gains momentum - it will be very difficult (impossible?) to stop.

One of my inside sources uses the word "evangelists" about the guys at Microsoft who are pushing the "unified experience". Yup - it almost has religious overtones. They have sold themselves on a concept - the only way to digital heaven is their way - and only hear what they want to hear. What other people call tunnel vision.
virsingh211
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virsingh211,
User Rank: Strategist
9/11/2013 | 10:56:31 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
windows 7 had pure user friendly costumed look and appearance which was getting faded some wherein front of sophisticated and cosmetic look of ios..i guess MS overlapped this in win8 and gave altogether fresh and appealing look. Apart from this iOS does include a search function, but it parses a drastically limited set of values, rather windows comes out with complete search results.win 8 appG«÷s settings and options are built directly into the app itself.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Author
9/11/2013 | 2:33:27 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
I don't think it's just the naysayers who don't get it. Windows 8 is a good operating system but there was too much Apple envy encapsulated in it. Apple has a cool touch user interface -- hey, we can do that too. Apple innovation came with insight into what consumers would want and use in the smart phone and tablet formats. It took the risk and reaped the reward. Imposing a touch screen experience on the PC user shows a lack of consumer insight. If you're going to copy Apple, then copy the part that restricted the touch interface to smaller, personal devices. Make it an option, not the default, on the PC.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/11/2013 | 1:46:29 AM
re: Microsoft's Journey May Leave Too Many Behind
Apple got it right by keeping its touch-based (iOS) and mouse-based (OS X) operating systems separate.
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