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Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
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BigIron01
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BigIron01,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/23/2013 | 11:04:34 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
If you pay for iTunes match, you get iTunes Radio ad-free and you can download any song iTunes recognizes in 256 bps AAC DRM-free.

iTunes match does not require you to upload all your music, rather it attempts to identify your music, and only songs that aren't recognised go up to the cloud.

Anything it recognises simply gives you access to the same song in iTunes.
BigIron01
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BigIron01,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/23/2013 | 10:59:44 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
The A7 is 1.3 ghz.

You know, you talk about driving more pixels than you can see like it's a good thing - in reality, it uses battery and CPU cycles needlessly.

Better, drive about 300 pixels/inch and if you have something external connected, drive as high a resolution as possible to that device.
hohum
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hohum,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/21/2013 | 2:10:10 AM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
I think you need to realise too that NFC. unlike the stupid FP sensor

( yes a FP sensor old stupid tech- with nil return on investment)

NFC has the capacity to enable all business' to have a generic payment system

its range of communication ensures no remote hacking.

Apple are IT industry nazis - sorry but its the only fair analogy.

Right now they are busy trying to create silly sub-patents. to limit

its use by other manufacturers

and they dont even make a device with one in it!!!
( this is just one of many)
http://appleinsider.com/articl...

This has been around for years -I use it currently on a N9.
The whole intent is to sabotage thru litigation and other means
any cross platform support.
I swear if they made cars they would make a stupid patent for
rubber tires.
( this is not about their phone or its quality)
You want to support this?
aditshar
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aditshar,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/13/2013 | 11:29:48 AM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
The interesting thing here is the M7 is
what Apple calls a "motion co-processor." i am not sure but its job is
to deal with data coming from sensors without activating the full power
of the A&, further it may help saving battery life and other one is
that they got an Arm v8 instruction set-based processor into production.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/13/2013 | 6:02:38 AM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
The files are still 720p if you move them to, say, a PC. As one of the other posters pointed out, Apple doesn't put HD screens on its iPhones because at this screen size, the extra pixels don't add anything to the image. The 120 fps option is very cool, though. Wish Apple had gone ahead with 60 fps at 1080p too.

I agree with the people who aren't that bothered by the NFC exception; like some others, I think Apple has its own plans, and it's not really missing out in the meantime.

I'm surprised people aren't more irked by Siri. I think both of the new iPhones look pretty terrific overall, but Apple has really failed to bring Siri along. For me, that's one of the bigger bummers. Apple got the mobile interaction model right, but perceptual computing technologies are going to be a big part of future interaction models. Apple seemed to have a head start here, but no longer.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
9/12/2013 | 9:01:45 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
For those who are more interested in the Enterprise implications of Apple's announcement, you might enjoy this info-parady on "The Apple Event for the Enterprise that never happened"
http://www.slideshare.net/Moov...
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
9/11/2013 | 7:19:41 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
As an iPhone and iPad mini user, I think the camera improvements are a huge pro. The appeal/utility of the 64-bit chip depends on how apps take advantage, and on that score, it's wait and see.
TerrellB
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TerrellB,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 7:15:33 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
So this is all Apple had to come up with? At Aroper-VEC when you purchased your first Iphone or Ipod it was what no one else was doing. So to make that comment makes no sense. Apple better find a innovator and quick.
veggiedude
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veggiedude,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 5:37:08 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
"Apple's iPhones stick to a non-standard 1136 x 640 pixel resolution that is incompatible with even 720p HD content, let alone 1080p."

I find this curious because it creates HD movies in 720p, at a frame rate of 120 - a big selling point of the new iPhone.

As far as Near-field communications (NFC) go, maybe Apple already has something else in place. The new fingerprint touch feature was touted as an easy way to instantly let you buy things through the iTunes store and it seems this will be Apple's foot in the door for all sales via the iPhone.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2013 | 4:16:22 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s, 5c: Pros And Cons
This is a good reason why Apple is not using NFC, at least for now:

http://www.computerworld.com/s...

And we should remember, or for those of you who are not really familiar with what Apple is doing, that they have an app that allows us to buy something in their stores, scan it, and pay for it without going to a sales person, or a counter. We can then walk out of the store with our purchase, unless we want a bag. Then we can ask a sales person for one.

This uses WiFi, and works very well. No need for NFC, and it works anywhere in the store. You don't need to go to a counter, and don't need a sales person. Much better. Apple doesn't even have sensors at the store exits.

I don't get the thing about "wireless charging". You need to buy the "wireless" charger, which, of course is wired to an outlet. Then it takes up a lot more space than the small charger that can be plugged into the wall socket. And is it really so much easier to put it down on to the surface of the charger rather than to plug the cord in? Not really! It's also less efficient, so some power is lost.

HD screen, really? That marketing ploy Samsung and a couple of others are using? It's been established that ppi counts more than about 320 can't be seen by the naked eye. These so called hi def displays are not helping at all. And if you want to watch the video on a real, large display, the iPhone can do that at full hi def.

More and more phones don't have a battery compartment. Those that do, do so because they have poor battery life. The iPhone has always had some of the best battery life, so it isn't really much of a problem. And if you really need a long, extended battery time, you can get a case that will double that life for little more than a battery, and won't need to change one sometime inconvenient.

Memory cards are another question. They may be useful, but you need to be carefulwhen buying them. The cheap ones slowdown the phone, and the fast ones are expensive. If you forget one, you're screwed.
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