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Why General Motors Went Green (But Not Cloud)
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cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
10/2/2013 | 12:29:14 AM
re: Why General Motors Went Green (But Not Cloud)
GM, knowingly or otherwise, is borrowing ideas from Google, Amazon, Facebook, eBay and Microsoft as it builds its "green" data center. So will other companies. GM is not so much rejecting cloud as adopting its innovations and architecture internally. The more thoroughly it does so, the easier it will be one day to integrate those operations with a public cloud. Right now it's in an outside-in phase, reversing years of outsourcing. i wouldn't be surprised to see Randy Mott's successor (at some distant future date) try another inside-out phase.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
9/23/2013 | 6:09:28 PM
re: Why General Motors Went Green (But Not Cloud)
you're right, and that's where a lot of big companies are these days. but i often hear data security and control as a big reason for sticking with private cloud rather than public. this offers other reasons -- integration, speed and cost advantages -- more prominently.
parkercloud
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parkercloud,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/22/2013 | 2:03:39 AM
re: Why General Motors Went Green (But Not Cloud)
Because they did not go Public Cloud does not mean they did not go Private cloud and I bet they did
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
9/20/2013 | 3:54:16 PM
re: Why General Motors Went Green (But Not Cloud)
A data center with 70% lower energy use? That seems like a win-win for environmental and economic stewardship. Those who complain about "tree huggers" and "unreasonable burdens on business" would do well to follow GM's example. Maybe self-regulation programs like LEED will make it more palatable than government-regulation-enforced compliance standards. But if "less than 5%" of IT centers are being certified, maybe we need to see tastier carrots (tax rebates?) or lightweight sticks (basic, building-code-enforced standards).
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
9/20/2013 | 3:42:34 PM
re: Why General Motors Went Green (But Not Cloud)
"Given its huge scale, GM expects to be able to
run a data center as efficiently as those providers and thus beat
vendors on overall cost." This is an intriguing statement, given Amazon's scale. Wonder what techniques GM will bring to bear.


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