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What Nanotube Computer Means To Moore's Law
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GigiB749
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GigiB749,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/28/2013 | 9:04:26 AM
re: What Nanotube Computer Means To Moore's Law
why would you go smaller and faster when 2 ghz is plenty for most.
if you need more.. build small number of supercomputers.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
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Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
9/27/2013 | 11:10:09 PM
re: What Nanotube Computer Means To Moore's Law
==-
> It can run two programs at the same time.

So can any other Turing-complete computing device, if it has two input streams. They probably meant that they implemented it to some extent, rather than that this gizmo is capable of it.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Author
9/27/2013 | 12:51:55 AM
re: What Nanotube Computer Means To Moore's Law
The ten-year gap between working model in the lab versus mass producible version tells us how far we have to go with nanotube research. Nevertheless, a very promising material that is completely renewable.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/26/2013 | 7:21:23 PM
re: What Nanotube Computer Means To Moore's Law
According to Stanford's press people, it should be just over a decade before we see a commercial nanotube computer.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
9/26/2013 | 4:47:32 PM
re: What Nanotube Computer Means To Moore's Law
"What's more, carbon nanotubes and silicon
transistors can work together on the same chip, which suggests the
possibility of a hybrid transition path." Intel engineers must be salivating over this project. The automated detection of defects sounds impressive.


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