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Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
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Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
10/2/2013 | 5:40:28 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
It's true, though I think a lot of the "replacements" will never happen. If we take ten aging Windows XP computers, one or two might get replaced by a new Windows machine, one or two might get replaced by a new OS X or Chromebook option, four or five might get "replaced" by tablets, and at least one will probably just sit there, continuing to age. I'm just making up numbers for the sake of an example, but you get the idea. Consumer PCs aren't going to be replaced at a 100% clip, and the ones that do get replaced aren't going to get replaced themselves for several years. So there's an opened door for alternatives, but the doorway isn't all that big.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2013 | 5:20:30 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
As existing XP or Win7 consumers look to replace their aging PC, Windows 8 has opened the door to considering alternatives. Those PC consumers owning iPads and iPhones will be more open to switch to an iMac or MacBook. Apple will make improved gains going forward as Microsoft sticks to its guns with Win8 for all devices. If you were to break down the sales chart between business share and consumer share I bet Win8 is loosing to Mac OS in the consumer share.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2013 | 5:08:25 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
And when a business makes the switch its to Win7 not Win8 because there is less of a learning curve to move from XP to Win7 than from XP to Win8.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2013 | 5:04:23 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
More and more consumers are going the Apple way as consumer PC buyers are forced to take Windows8 while businesses still buy Win7 machines. Go to Best Buy and you won't find any Win7 PCs. If a consumer is going to be forced to relearn the OS i.e. Win8 verses Win7/XP then why not change to a vendor that doesn't re-arrange the deck chairs with each major release?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
10/1/2013 | 9:49:31 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
Yep, it definitely puts it into perspective. Windows 8 is being used by WAY more people than all versions of OS X combined, and once Windows 8.1 arrives, the margin will grow larger still.

Nonetheless, it's complicated. Apple has to be a little concerned that Mac sales have been soft in recent quarters; the brand had until that point been resistant to the larger PC market's downturns.

But to an extent, Apple could care less about market share. Apple dominates laptop sales over $1000, and makes nice, fat margins on each. iMacs are popular too, and even Apple's forgotten step children, like the Mac Mini, are very profitable. Microsoft gets a lot of tangential benefit from Windows, but in terms of direct profit, it just gets a bunch of license royalties, and Windows OEMs have traditionally moved a lot of volume with low-margin commodity hardware sold at low prices. Apple gets not only revenue from OS upgrades, which is neither huge nor nominal, but also the kind of hardware revenue that Microsoft can only dream of. Pros and cons to each approach.

Microsoft's Windows-related profits have changed thanks to the Surface line and Windows 8, of course. I think Windows 8.1 will be better, and I think both the new Surface tablets are great pieces of hardware-- albeit very questionably priced. For Microsoft, though, the Surface Pro 2 won't just have to prove the merits Windows 8.1; it will also have to invade some of the markets where MacBook Airs and MacBook Pros have traditionally gobbled up market share. If Microsoft can actually make headway in this price bracket, it would be impressive.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
10/1/2013 | 7:30:21 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
"Microsoft COO Kevin Turner said in September that 21% of Microsoft's commercial customers are still using XP, and that the company expects to reduce that number to 13% by April." That's a pretty ambitious change plan by April. I see XP over and over again in the wild in retail and hospitality settings.
NPCO
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NPCO,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2013 | 5:56:58 PM
re: Windows 8 Adoption Slows Ahead Of Windows 8.1
Kinda funny to think that even as colossal a failure as Windows 8 has been, it's market share is still greater than the 3 most recent versions of the MacOS... combined.

Not intending to say anything for Microsoft or against Apple, just that viewing the numbers in some context does change the picture a bit.

I'm cautiously looking forward to 8.1. Despite it's obvious and numerous teething problems, I've found 8 to be a pretty solid OS overall.


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