Comments
Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
anon5809147095
50%
50%
anon5809147095,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 3:46:52 PM
Re: Confused
Good luck you'll have a 6 hour wait time for the DB to mount with 250GB in memory if you restart the sql instance.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
12/30/2013 | 1:43:36 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
TimesTen is an all-in-memory database that has been around for quite some time, but it has always served in a niche-applications role, in industries such as telecommunications. It is not a general-purpose database like Oracle Database or Microsoft SQL Server. The reason Microsoft and Oracle are introducing in-memory options for their flagship databases is to give customers the option of accelerating any application or certain aspects of applications that demand low latency.
sgittleson
50%
50%
sgittleson,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/30/2013 | 5:45:12 AM
Confused
I thouight 2012 puts SQL in Ram already? If you DB is small enough

 

So for smaller DB's say 150GB in size. If I have 256GB of RAM on the 2008 R2 enterprize server. 2012 is already putting the DB in memory if my DB is 150GB?

 

So are you saying this feature is new in terms of that for larger DB's 200GB+ you can now choose what tables & indexs you want to add to RAM.

 

So for smaller DB's sub 200GB where you have enough RAM for the entire DB SQL 2014 will not offer any new performance benefits?

 

Thanks,

 

-Steven
shonthom
50%
50%
shonthom,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/30/2013 | 3:38:57 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
Oracle times ten operates on in memory databases, and it has already been released. This article mentioned the in memory options in 12c, so what's the difference between the 12c option and the current times ten features?
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
10/18/2013 | 7:39:22 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
Here's to the hope that the identity issue can be resolved. Then it might be possible to take an existing application, with some other more minor index restrictions, and move heavily updated tables into RAM with few or zero schema changes.

IMO it's absolutely impressive that some objects in an existing DB could be moved to RAM thereby eliminating a lot of lock overhead. If the identity issue can be solved, I think that will be a huge upgrade draw for those looking offer improved performance without radically redesigning the application or entertaining a significant infrastructure upgrade (other than adding lots of RAM).
kfarlee
50%
50%
kfarlee,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/18/2013 | 5:39:38 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
The granularity of objects that can be placed in memory is indeed the table and its associated indexes. the indexes are significantly different to take advantage of the fact that all rows in the table can be reached by a pointer reference. This contrasts with most or all other in-memory offerings, where the granularity is the database.

This means that you can approach adoption incrementally, moving only the data that is a performance issue, and not investing in tables which are not a problem.

Primary keys are indeed required for durable tables, however
tables that are declared as non-durable do not require them.

Identity is currently a limitation in the product which we
are actively working to eliminate.
You are correct that this technology isn't a substitute for understanding where your bottlenecks and performance issues are, and being targeted in your enhancements.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
10/17/2013 | 8:25:55 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
OK -- it looks like the whole table needs to be in memory and there are some interesting restrictions. Maximum of eight indexes, there must be a primary key and it cannot be an identity column. That last one caught be by surprise because I was thinking I could upgrade a DB to 2014, move a few tables into memory and experience a nice performance improvement. However, the restrictions mean it's far more deliberate than I was initially thinking. (i.e. max out the server's RAM, upgrade to 2014, move the hot tables into memory and after lunch, play a round of golf.)
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
10/17/2013 | 12:19:48 AM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
Follow the links in the article above to the many blogs and white papers Microsoft has made available on the technical details of the implementation. CTP 2 brought new capabilities.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2013 | 10:28:37 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
How granular is the in-memory option? When they say table, does a table include all of its indexes or can you pick an choose any object you want to put in RAM? Of course it doesn't make a lot of sense to put the table in RAM and leave indexes on disk but sometimes a heavily modified table has a lot of referential integrity lookups. Sometimes those lookup tables aren't frequently updated and to satisfy the RI check, it might require less RAM to just put the checked index in memory instead of the table and all of its indexes.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
10/16/2013 | 7:03:47 PM
re: Microsoft SQL Server 2014: Final Countdown
I interviewed Quentin Clark, Corporate VP of the Data Platform Group at Microsoft, as part of my research for this article. It was Clark who announced CTP 2 on Wednesday, and here's what he told InformationWeek about Microsoft's two key in-memory competitors:

"There are in-memory solutions that exist that are new products [Author's note: He's clearly talking about SAP Hana here]. What they tell customers is, 'if you have an existing application or a packaged app, it will have to be rewritten.'

We don't subscribe to that view. We are building in-memory capabilities into Microsoft SQL Server in a way that's compatible so that customers will not be faced with rewriting their applications. That, alone, weeds out nearly all in-memory databases that are commercially available.

The other thing we can look at is where we are in development. Between our in-memory columnar work [for analytics], which was introduced in SQL Server 2012, and our in-memory transaction processing work, which will release as part of SQL Server 2014, we're light years ahead of where our competitors are [Author's note: Here he's clearly talking about the coming Oracle in-memory option for 12c]. They may have announced something, but there's no product there and there's not even a description of when that product may come."


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July10, 2014
When selecting servers to support analytics, consider data center capacity, storage, and computational intensity.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join InformationWeek’s Lorna Garey and Mike Healey, president of Yeoman Technology Group, an engineering and research firm focused on maximizing technology investments, to discuss the right way to go digital.
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.