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Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
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Mitch432
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Mitch432,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/20/2013 | 12:01:43 AM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
There's so many problems with the reasoning in this piece of opinion fluff that it's difficult to decide where to begin...

How about here: "Surely Apple could create a unique phone each
year. It simply chooses not to. I understand its thinking and strategy
here, but as a consumer and as a tech journalist, I want to see Apple do
more."

Hmmm, I wish Information Week would publish more thoughtful analysis about the implications of Apple's technology on enterprises, many of which don't give a damn about annual change for the sake of change. This article is NOT that, for sure.

Instead, we readers get this lame attempt at luring eyeballs to the site's ads.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2013 | 11:57:23 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
Fair enough. You didn't like the phone and returned it. Good on you. And you got some hits out of your article via controversy as well. I'd say you've gotten your money's worth.

I'm not sure about upgrading to the 5s either. The inaccuracy of the level and compass is not in keeping with (at least my idea of) Apple's high standard. It's kind of antenna gate all over again, isn't it?

I'm hanging with my 4s until Apple addresses those little glitches. Maybe I, too, will have to wait for the 6. But, Android? Um, not thanks.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2013 | 11:50:13 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
"I am going to be seen as an Apple hater but I am not." -10 points on your essay. You failed to develop your thesis statement and provide examples.
JSRES
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JSRES,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 11:44:46 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
Do people really believe that either of these companies (Apple or Samsung) will ever go out of business?? Come on!! How many times has Dell, HP, TI, IBM, made huge blunders in technology, yet they are still chugging along, just as Apple and Samsung will.
WillS111
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WillS111,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 11:05:59 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
Seriously, not worthy of the Apple Brand?? You have obviously been drinking the cool aid. That you could say that in a public forum establishes your credibility at ZERO. The Apple brand would earn me as a customer if they could deliver a good product at a reasonable product. But self delusion probably helps you justify for overpaying for a mediocre product. As Buggs Bunny would say "what a Macaroon"!!
MrEdofCourse
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MrEdofCourse,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 11:05:52 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
I actually prefer Apple to keep the same 2 year design cycle. It allows us to use accessories that fit the design for a much longer period.

The best value on the iPhone is to upgrade every two years and do so under contract. You'll find whether you're on an number or S cycle, the releases will be significant. The advantage of being on an S cycle is that things are usually more fleshed out... especially as far as accessories go. For example, I remember when the iPhone 5 came out, I had to wait quite a long time for battery cases, while the iPhone 5S can use any of the battery cases designed for the iPhone 5.

An article pointing out that an iPhone S without any subsidy isn't worth upgrading to is kind of pointless as that should always be a given... unless you're thinking that phones can continue to evolve at a pace where you'd want to spend $900 a year on the hardware.
WillS111
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WillS111,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 11:01:13 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
You might want to check back in with your doctor, the meds aren't working!
WillS111
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WillS111,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 10:57:22 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
I am going to be seen as an Apple hater but I am not. I travel the world quite a bit. Here are some realities, Apple has no chance to succeed in China. Their product is grossly overpriced and the Chinese have a lot of very good and cheaper alternatives. Apple is trying to position themselves as a luxury product. The number of luxury electronic products is very small and almost all are in the audiophile category. Reality, I purchased a "refurbished" smart phone from ebay for $100, I have 48 Gig of memory with my 32 gig SD card. It is at least as good as my wife's iphone. And with Andriod I get a ton of free apps.

I spend time in Brazil and an iPhone here cost twice as much as any other phone on the market. If you are going to try and be a luxury product people should be getting something more, a Galaxy 4 from Samsung is a vastly superior product and at a lower price. I also own a Kindle Fire HD, I really use it a lot and enjoy what it offers. And if it gets stolen I am out $200 try that with an Apple iPad mini. And the Apple store - give me a break! Who buys music anymore when you can run Spotify and get free movies from Netflix and Amazon?

And the iMacs are a disaster, why anyone would buy one is beyond me, and basically no one is buying them. Three years from now Apple will be at best a $200 stock and I really think a $150 stock. And from the reviews I have been reading the IPhone 5s is also a technical disaster. If I had been at a different point in life I would have made a small fortune short selling Apple when it was at $700. I am retired so no more short selling in my future. If you want to make some real money I think there is still a lot to be made short selling Apple at $500. If you want to play it safer try some LEAP Puts on Apple.
maursader
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maursader,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 10:40:12 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
Hey Eric, I found that I agreed with several points of your article, as I also own an iPhone 5. With that being said, I strongly agree that those who own the iPhone 5 won't find a lot of value in upgrading to the 5s. One thing I'd like to add though, for discussion purposes is one theoretical reason to justify Apple's reason for these "slight" upgrades; it has to do with cell phone giants and contracts. You mentioned buying your iPhone for the full price (as did I) so you wouldn't need to extend your contract, however, it seems (starting from the iPhone 3g) that if you were to purchase an iPhone on a 2 year term, you'd get a subsidized price (way cheaper iPhone to start) and by the time that 2 year contract is up, the next generation iPhone is out (so in this case, the iPhone 4). After signing a new 2 year contract, 2 years later, you'd be looking at getting an iPhone 5, and so on. In summary, I feel as if apple reserves innovations for those who are contract bound with their cell phone carriers such that when their contract is over, a next-gen iPhone is ready to go with enough features to warrant an upgrade. People who spend $900 to go from an iPhone 5 to a 5s won't see the benefit. Cheers. Ps. Android users, this isn't a discussion about which platform is better moreso than getting the most value out of your current smartphone, versus upgrading to the next generation. It's so sad to see merit-less debates about both sides. It's technology people, embrace it.
anon0879225698
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anon0879225698,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2013 | 10:29:04 PM
re: Why I Returned My iPhone 5s
Blackhatt are the random personal attacks really necessary? Its just a phone.
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