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Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
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Becca L
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Becca L,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/14/2013 | 3:13:10 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
One of the other things about these camera sales is that they can also be one per household, instead of mobile which is one per person. DSLRs are rarely monopolized throughout the day, so they are ideal for sharing, and families/couples may make a one time investment in a solid camera to last them years while mobiles are replaced every two years. As mobile cameras get better, the situations where a DSLR will make a world of difference are watered down "eh, my phone camera will do."
Becca L
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Becca L,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/14/2013 | 3:08:07 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
Great point about the weight of the DSLR. Our laptops are getting lighter, our phones are getting smaller and sleeker, but cameras get bulkier - and that's seems to be preferred by those using the cameras professionally, but as an amateur/casual photog, I can not be carrying these things around with me all day. For the life I lead, the convenience of a DSLR camera is just about nill.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
11/12/2013 | 9:08:30 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
Interchangeable lenses for iPhones also have the problem of (probably) not being forward compatible. I've avoided getting an iPhone snap-on lens simply because I expect that the next phone I buy will not work with lens acquired for an earlier model phone.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
11/12/2013 | 12:00:35 AM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
It's hard to argue with the ease-of-use, sharing features and, increasingly, the picture quality of smartphone cams. Granted, snapping a sunset with your iPhone and throwing an Instagram filter on it is not exactly photography, but it looks enough like it to please most folks -- and really hurt dSLR sales. The pros know the difference, but smartphones are getting closer and closer to the real thing.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
11/11/2013 | 9:58:15 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
I don't think anyone disputes the quality difference. It really comes down to what you want. Purists want great pics, but most of us just want something adequate.
Like wines - I can't stand most of them, but some are okay. However, wine snobs would denigrate me for my choices and say I have no idea what I am doing. Same applies here.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
11/11/2013 | 9:50:20 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
I think the point is that I can hit two buttons on my phone and do the same without moving anything.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
11/11/2013 | 9:48:55 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
My only disagreement with your statement is that they will regret it in the future. Many of the pics taken today are just Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter fodder which reduces the size that most people see it in. The quality reduction is no big deal for them. I take pics with my phone all the time and it is good enough for my purposes, but my wife still loves to have a separate "take real pictures" camera.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
11/11/2013 | 9:28:53 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
For soccer games, the iPhone is not enough. You need a good telephoto lens.
FredB493
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FredB493,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/11/2013 | 7:11:27 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
I'm not really a camera wonk, but IMO anyone who finds a smartphone to be a decent replacement for their dSLR, or even a good point and shoot. Their tiny lens's limited light-gathering capabilities and non-existent optical zoom means they are very limited in their capabilities. Fine for quick snapshots and in situations with good lighting, but there are so many shots they're just not capable of taking. I don't have an SLR, but I will continue to use my Panasonic ZS-1 when I want to take better pictures. OTOH, my phone is pretty much always with me, so it's the go to for quick snapshots that I wouldn't have taken otherwise. Under the right circumstances it takes pictures that are comparable to those a better camera would take, not like the crappy camera phones from years ago.
JeffM935
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JeffM935,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/11/2013 | 6:12:27 PM
re: Smartphones Destroying High-End Camera Sales
If you add up every photo taken with any camera, what percentage of those images actually get printed out to a 16x20 print, matted, framed and hung on the wall? Maybe .0001 percent? The ones that actually look good are photos taken with a better DSLR camera. You don't need much to make a photo look good on a computer monitor and even less on a small smartphone screen. So, unless you are doing some real photography work, the smart phone is all you really need. But I can't imagine some of my favorite prints hanging around my office with blue ribbons dangling from them ever being taken with a smartphone. There is much more to quality than pixel count.
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