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Stealing America’s Future
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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/18/2013 | 2:14:32 PM
Stand Together
At some point, US companies need to follow the lead of consumers who willingly pay more for products made in the United States. If there were no demand for products made as a result of stolen IP, the incentive to pirate IP would (in theory) abate.

Say you're in the market for piece of custom automation equipment to, say, install lenses in cameras. You can get it from a US company for $200,000 or a Chinese company for $125,000. On looking deeper, you realize that the machines are essentially identical, and the US company has been in this market for 5 years while the Chinese operation started 18 months ago.

Who gets the contract?
Marilyn Cohodas
IW Pick
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
11/18/2013 | 10:25:35 AM
Who has an IP security program?
 "One has to wonder how many organizations have an IP security program in place."

Kevin your last point says it alll and I'd be interested in hearing from readers, what steps, if any their organizations are taking (outside of the actions after the fact) to prevent IP theft. 
Alison Diana
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Alison Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
11/18/2013 | 9:45:20 AM
Beyond Paper
Salespeople and execs are often bound by non-compete agreements when they move from one company to another. Often businesses will vigorously pursue cases in court if they believe their non-competes have been violated. Of course, if someone works on a company-owned device -- laptop, phone, tablet -- that part is easy. With BYOD, it's more complicated for IT to ensure it's removed corporate data from an ex-employee's mobile device -- and that doesn't cover anything copied, unless it couldn't be copied in the first place.

Ironic that government may be seen as an ally in preventing corporate spying -- back-doors demanded by the NSA are one way foreign (and local) spies can try to break in to steal proprietary data. 


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