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10 Most Misunderstood Facebook Privacy Facts
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alexvirginboy
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alexvirginboy,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/5/2014 | 4:45:56 AM
Re: Assume they can see it
yes it is true Even when you lock down your privacy settings, some comments and photos can slip through as this article by Kristin shows. It's definitely a good rule.. http://www.fuoye.edu.ng
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2013 | 10:11:51 PM
Re: assume the worst
Exactly. That's the best way to look at it.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/3/2013 | 11:48:13 AM
Re: Re : 10 Most Misunderstood Facebook Privacy Facts
@SachinEE -- it's all about money and data. Especially with free services, you agree to giving up some personal data (and a whole lot more than you may have bargained for if you don't understanding the privacy settings and policies).
Shepy
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Shepy,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2013 | 7:34:12 AM
assume the worst
I think the whole system has become so modular and broken up that it's hard to know what's going on where. It's getting to the point where the only sensible consideration is to assume anything and everything is publically viewable and act accordingly
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 1:29:31 AM
Re : 10 Most Misunderstood Facebook Privacy Facts
@ Kristin Burnham, that's exactly I tend to do. I don't use anything liberally that is supposed to be online unless I know the full use of it. But in today's social media world, even this is not enough. You can't really trust what they tell you about your privacy settings. The only option seems to be to test every privacy setting to see for yourself if it works the same way as is mentioned.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 1:29:28 AM
Re : 10 Most Misunderstood Facebook Privacy Facts
@ Laurianne, this is the ultimate option not to write down anything you don't want someone to read. I still have this pinching question why websites like Facebook don't come up clean on their policies. Why should we be getting back into our shells instead of these websites respecting our privacy? It seems like we have to regress back in social network technology.
OlivierAmar
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OlivierAmar,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/23/2013 | 12:54:04 PM
Apps are the worst. Here's how to manage them.
@kristen, have you checked our MyPermissions.com? If you're worried about FB apps or any other service, you should check them out. Reach out to me if you want more info.
chrisp114
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chrisp114,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2013 | 9:39:31 PM
Privacy
If you want true privacy, then you should check out Ravetree.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
11/21/2013 | 7:42:25 PM
Facebook monitors non-Facebook searches, too
The last time I went onto Amazon.com, that site suggested reading choices the were so on-target that it was positively eerie. I later learned that if you don't turn facebook off, they monitor ALL your online services, and hands the results to others, including Amazon.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 11:40:48 AM
Re: Apps are the worst
Facebook is sneaky when it comes to apps--thanks for bringing that point up. I'd bet that very few people read the fine print about what information and permissions individual apps request before they click "Ok."
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