Comments
Get Ready For Internet Of Clouds
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cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
12/4/2013 | 4:28:46 PM
Create your own marketplace of four providers
Wow. A gem buried deep in this commentary: it would only take access to four providers to reach 60% of the benefit of having a large market with many cloud service competitors. That is, chossing between suppliers for various types of workloads or at various times of day would lead to major savings by the customer willing to make such choices. 
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/25/2013 | 10:37:51 AM
Re: Cloud security
Brett, thanks for the additional information. I'm not quite sure if I understand all of it; it's quite mind-boggling. Curiouser and curiouser!
BrettReif
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BrettReif,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/23/2013 | 5:13:59 AM
Re: Cloud security
Interesting question... and this has a lot to do with defining and refining what the intercloud will be to the majority of adopters as this space develops. The intercloud will be an integration of online events, actions and data "flows" that provide for more collaboration amongst online or even on-premise software services that were previously unconnected.

Intercloud data won't create a new place where the data lives per se. It will just open up the potential places you can flow data between the separate services you already use (or would like to use). The platforms being created will create dynamic connections and provide much more flexibility in assigning the rules around automating the movement of information. For instance:

- Qualifying a social marketing lead and transfering info from LinkedIn to Salesforce

- Monitoring websites and Twitter for brand mentions while measuring sentiment

- Assigning priority queues with up-to-date prospect information and incident notifications

These platforms should NOT be saving any of the data. Be wary of any platforms that DO save information. The burden of privacy and susceptibility to attacks will still reside with online cloud services and software. Not with the glue in-between.
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/22/2013 | 9:52:16 AM
Re: Cloud security
Brett, thanks so much for your thoughtful response. Yes, I was definitely asking in terms of enterprise security. I was envisioning Intercloud as something akin to a VPN, so I thought it might give enteprises more privacy and control over some portion of the cloud. I think a lot of the concerns about cloud security are not user-related, but more about where data lives and whether its susceptible to attack. So applying policies and certain protections would be very helpful -- is that something the manager platforms will provide?
jweinman0791
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jweinman0791,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/22/2013 | 5:50:24 AM
Re: Where are the big dogs?
Hi Laurianne...hopefully the major cloud service providers will realize that standards such as these ultimately will benefit them as well as customers and will help shape the standards via IEEE standards development processes.
BrettReif
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BrettReif,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2013 | 5:40:44 PM
Re: Cloud security
Hi there Susan,

While I can't speak to the IEEE standardization of security protocols, I hope I can address some of the implications around intercloud security. I read your question to be regarding the integration and implementation of intercloud solutions for enterprise organizations.

Many are concerned by the perceived loss of control that comes along with cloud infrastructure and services. It's natural to be fearful with new untested tech developments. However, with foresight, implementation and traditional enterprise controls, putting the intercloud "pipes" between endpoints will more likely than not have very little impact on enterprise security or misappropriation of data. Sensitive company and customer data, will be as safe as it ever was... or wasn't.

With the incredibly high levels of encryption that are moving data from point A to B (or C/D/Etc.) the majority of security concerns will remain where they have always been... with the people using the services at each endpoint. The adoption of Cloud technology does present many in an organization to unwittingly [or knowingly] blast the world with sensitive information. However, with many of the Intercloud Manager Platforms that are being built currently, we will be able to attain more flexibility and visibility into difficult to enforce security and compliance policies... even more so as those change over time. It will be easier than ever to monitor activity across an organization's technology stack.

If we open up scenarios of integration among companies (ie the airline scenario from Joe's recent Forbes article here) the traditional perception of information ownership might get a little trickier.

If I missed the mark on your concern let me know. Love chatting about the intercloud :)
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
11/21/2013 | 1:14:01 PM
A world-wide web of infrastructure?
Joe is chairman of the IEEE Intercloud Testbed executive committee and knows whereof he speaks when it comes to a future Internet of clouds. One day, I think the daisy chains of CenturyLink, Verizon, Amazon, Microsoft and Google data centers around the world will be linked, both within the chain and across chains, forming a worldwide web of infrastructure that never goes dark. It will take service provider commitment to use the Testbed to get there.
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 10:00:59 AM
Cloud security
Joe, it's great to see you here. While I was reading, I kept waiting for you to mention security, because it seems improved security would be a benefit of this standardization. What are the security implications?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 9:22:04 AM
Where are the big dogs?
Joe, interesting post. Where do VMware, Amazon, Microsoft ad Google stand with regard to this standard? For or against?


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