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Personal Computing Device Required: BYOD Should Rule
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
12/3/2013 | 9:54:55 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
Thanks for that sharing your personal experience developing a BYOD policy -- including the good, the bad and the ugly. I suspect what didn't work (end-runs & exceptions) are fairly typical. I like your simple "no nonsesnse" approach -- beyond stern warning to actually setting an example by wiping a violator's phone. Your policy of offering employees choices from a list of preferred hardware and software devices conforms to the results so far of our BYOD flash poll. 

Anybody else have a BYOD strategy that works? Let's chat about it in the comments.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
12/3/2013 | 7:43:16 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
The craziness was a former employer and no their BYOD policies did not work.  They went as far as implementing a system that checked for hardware changes and would lock out devices if you plugged in a phone to your PC's USB port for example but that only lasted so long until two things happened.  First people found ways around the software locks and second higher level employees had their desktops removed from such policies rendering the whole system pointless.  Currently my BYOD policy is very simple but comes with very stern warnings and a no nonsense action plan.  We list preferred hardware and software versions for smart phones and tablets.  We have our own cloud based storage solution that users have access to from their own devices and they are expected to use that service.  When you agree to use your own device you sign a document saying that you understand that the company has the right to wipe your device remotely should we suspect there is data on it that should not be there, if your employment is terminated or if your device is lost.  Yes, I have remotely wiped someone's phone when it was learned that they were saving sensitive documents on it's internal memory rather than leaving it on the cloud storage solution.  It only took doing it once for everyone else to realize that the policy was there for a reason.  BYOD has quite a few benefits but you do have to be careful regarding the level of control that you give up. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2013 | 10:04:52 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
SaneIT, with all your commentary on your experience with physical device checks at the door, you've got me wondering what your company's "sensible BYOD policies" are. Do they work?  
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
12/2/2013 | 8:50:21 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
No, they were just there to keep "unauthorized" people and items from entering the building.  What was really funny is that we had moved from a site where we rented about half of the office space and the building owners handled security with a couple of guys who walked the lobby area and were more or less there to direct people to the appropriate suites inside the building.  When we moved to our own space it become necessary to stop everyone before they got past the lobby and there was one armed guard on duty 24/7 with one unarmed checking people in and watching people badge through a set of turnstiles. 
Alex Kane Rudansky
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Alex Kane Rudansky,
User Rank: Author
11/27/2013 | 11:08:37 AM
Security
I've spoken with security experts who dislike BYOD mostly because of human error. They've seen too many doctors lose their unlocked devices, giving anyone who picks up the device access to sensitive information. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
11/27/2013 | 7:53:28 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
Armed security guards? Really? I assume they were hired to look for something more dangerous than unauthorized mobile devices. But still....
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/27/2013 | 7:50:56 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
We had armed security guards, I'd be shocked if they stopped more than one person per month trying to bring items in.   Chances are if they recognized you then they weren't going to go through your bags.  I walked in and out with a backpack every day without ever being stopped.  Not that it mattered since if I really wanted anything I wouldn't have needed a camera to get it.  Policies are nice but they have to be written with some basis in reality.
Chuck Brooks
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Chuck Brooks,
User Rank: Author
11/26/2013 | 1:17:58 PM
BYOD
BYOD is already happening in both the public and private sector. The best solution is a personal computing device with two processors that can isolate work activities from personal so malware cannot be tranferred.
Adam2IT
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Adam2IT,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/26/2013 | 11:31:29 AM
HTML5 & BYOD
HTML5 can be an important tool for managing BYOD issues. For example, Ericom's AccessNow HTML5 RDP client enables remote users to securely connect from iPads, iPhones, Android devices, Chromebooks and more traditional laptops and PCs to any RDP host, including Terminal Server and VDI virtual desktops, and run their applications and desktops in a browser. AccessNow doesn't require any software installation on the end user device – just an HTML5 browser, connection and login credentials. An employee that brings in their own device merely opens their HTML5-compatible browser and connects to the URL given them by the IT admin.

That protects corporate data by keeping it off the device, and also reduces IT support costs, since IT staff don't need to spend time installing software on so many different platforms.

Visit http://www.ericom.com/BYOD_Workplace for more info.

Please note that I work for Ericom
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
11/26/2013 | 8:32:45 AM
Re: Get rid of legacy applications, then we'll talk
"..ignoring BYOD or pretending that you can keep it out of your company is short sighted. "

Totally agree.  Better to address the BYO reality with a practical policy. (In other words, don't let perfect get in the way of good). Of maybe hire bouncers to check employees and visitors for unauthorized devices at the door. 
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