Comments
Give Thanks To The Datacenter
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2013 | 8:26:22 AM
Re: work-life balance
To your point, Li, about how smarter technology improves productivity (and quality of work life) through better tools, automation. and remote monitoring That's all very true.  Let's hope that we'll have even better tools and more datacenter jobs to be thankful for next Thanksgiving.
Li Tan
50%
50%
Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
12/2/2013 | 12:14:24 AM
Re: work-life balance
Marilyn, I do agree on your point - the work-life balance is very important for a vital and productive team. We cannot debate the importance of it. The technology evolution should not mean just only more powerful servers or the capability to handle big-data analysis. The datacenter should be smarter as well to relieve the IT stuff from monitoring, disaster recovery and emergency call-out duty.
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2013 | 11:10:17 PM
Re: Cloud a double-edged turkey knife
@Lorna: There's probably a grain of truth to your comments, at least for companies who choose to go entirely to the cloud. It seems to me though that many companies are mixing and matching between external and internal cloud for their compute resources. Hopefully that will mean that most people simply end up managing a somewhat different infrastucture. Either way though, change in the data center means change in job roles, and - just perhaps - reduction in jobs if some services are outsourced. But maybe as suggested by others, the jobs simply move to the cloud providers instead? Of course, this begs the question as to whether resource needs scale one for one for a real cloud environment versus a legacy environement (I fear not). Still, adaptability is king, as always!
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/27/2013 | 9:17:00 AM
Re: work-life balance
Marilyn, I'm sure the cloud providers have very sophisticated remote monitoring. But really you are just passing the buck. The cloud datacenter managers are probably checking their smartphones (or tablets) while they're at the dinner table, or watching football. But it still beats running to the physical location every time there's a blip on the radar.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
11/27/2013 | 8:26:23 AM
work-life balance
With today's ability to monitor, diagnose, and even repair such glitches remotely, there should be a lot fewer datacenter widows (and widowers) holding the fort on special occasions.


Hopefully that applies applies to mobile monitoring, as well. I wouldn't want to see our infrastructure heroes sitting at the Thanksgiving dinner table eating the bird with their right hand and checking their smartphone for an update on the status of a service disruption at their CSP. 
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/26/2013 | 11:13:05 AM
Re: Infrastructure
Whoopty, excellent point. The datacenters will exist someplace, if not within the walls of your current company. And they will need to be managed by skilled professionals, because preventing any loss of service will be even more critical.
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
11/26/2013 | 10:35:19 AM
Infrastructure
While dedicated datacenters might be on the decline, at least the growth of mobile infrastructure and those within cloud facilities themselves are on the rise. It's all getting centralised, so your job may go in one location, but others will be opening up elsewhere. 
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/26/2013 | 10:24:48 AM
Re: Cloud a double-edged turkey knife
LOL, Lorna, that is definitely a glass-half-full observation. You are right that smaller and mid-sized businesses run the risk of their datacenters being replaced by other resources. I think the article is leaning more toward established datacenters that will most likely leverage the infrastructure they already have and adapt to new technologies. But maybe the #1 thing to give thanks for is having a job in the first place.
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/26/2013 | 9:50:43 AM
Cloud a double-edged turkey knife
Not to be a killjoy, but cloud and the maturation of co-lo facilities may just mean that by next Thanksgiving, engineers in typical midsize enterprise datacenters understand what it feels like to be a turkey on Nov. 20th or so. 


The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.