Comments
Call Center Lessons Learned
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
kfaw
50%
50%
kfaw,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/17/2013 | 11:54:06 PM
Re: Preparedness
Thanks JaydenC953.

It's so important for IT leaders to keep the simple and fundamental business concerns present in mind. As you said, "A minute of unproductivity is a big deal in a call center" - That's worth its own post, I think. It brings up many questions that can help leaders plan and design for better business outcomes, even before we get asked to address them.

What are all the ways our technology gets rid of that one minute of UNproductivity in the call center, and what are the ways our own service level agreements are insufficient to prevent unproductivity? How are we prepared to get things running again as quickly as possible? Have we considered the costs of poor execution on the technology side of a single minute of UNproductivity in terms of lost revenues, wasted payroll for idle agents or the negative effects on customer service?
JaydenC953
50%
50%
JaydenC953,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/17/2013 | 9:40:06 PM
Preparedness
"You can't anticipate everything that can go wrong. But it is prudent to set up channels for communication before a crisis hits." This is true. Disasters can happen anytime and it is important that you are prepared when that happens. A minute of unproductivity is a big deal in a call center, that is why we should always be on alert.
kfaw
50%
50%
kfaw,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/3/2013 | 10:35:07 AM
Re: Errors and Omissions
They are fundamental, so they apply at all times and in all circumstances. Because they are so fundamental, people sometimes overlook them or take them for granted.

Much like professional sports teams drill the fundamentals, it is important for business professionals not to overlook them, and to discuss them vigorously without blowing them off as philosophical... How we think shapes how we act and how we collaborate with others.
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2013 | 11:53:53 AM
Re: Errors and Omissions
Ken, you are so right (and not about your editor being awesome, although I am not going to argue the point ;)). Many of the decisions businesses make about technology are really about people and human nature, and we sometimes forget that. Even though these are "economic" principles, they are really about how people think and act, and that needs to be factored in whenever anything new is introduced in the workplace.
kfaw
50%
50%
kfaw,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2013 | 11:17:49 AM
Re: Errors and Omissions
Thanks Sue. I need to make the links for myself next time... my editor is awesome!

There is much to say about every one of those principles, so it wouldn't hurt to remember "people face tradeoffs" as well as "people respond to incentives". Sometimes the simplest principles carry much more meaning, but they seem so obvious to us that we overlook them.

--k
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/27/2013 | 9:12:49 AM
Re: Errors and Omissions
Hmmmm, apparently the "good editor" was not good enough to catch that error, even though she looked up Mankiw's principles and linked to them. Luckily we are good sports around here :)
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
11/27/2013 | 9:10:05 AM
Re: call centers
Chuck, you are absolutely right that good people are what makes a call center effective. But I also believe that giving those people great technology can make improve their productivity dramatically. Sometimes clunky and cumbersome tools get in the way of people doing their as well as they could. 
kfaw
50%
50%
kfaw,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/26/2013 | 4:42:33 PM
Errors and Omissions
I realized as I reviewed my post that I referred to "People respond to incentives" as Greg Mankiw's first fundamental economic principle. It is actually his fourth in the list.

Another lesson learned. I'll be more careful next time.

--k
kfaw
50%
50%
kfaw,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/26/2013 | 3:32:00 PM
Re: Call center planning
Thanks Chris... you should have seen the really weird angles I was taking on this post originally. It's good to have a good editor to kick things back at you.

--k
kfaw
50%
50%
kfaw,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/26/2013 | 3:30:33 PM
Re: call centers
I agree, Chuck. In many ways, a really good integration strategy is invisible. Our work in IT is so important that it should disappear when everything is flowing smoothly.

That makes it possible for operators to focus on incentives, training and retention as you suggest.

I had a business coach who said we don't notice fire alarms or sprinklers until we first notice the fire. Nobody notices good integration. But without it, it can be hard to focus on or improve operations.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.