Comments
Attention Apple Shoppers: iBeacon Is Watching
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Dusanwriter
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Dusanwriter,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/9/2013 | 12:41:08 PM
"Tracking?"
You guys have done what a lot of the media seems to have picked up: written a headline that's at odds with the article.

You did a great job describing that the 'tracking' is entirely permission based. You need an app, you need location services to be on, you need Bluetooth to be on....and even then, the beacons themselves don't do the tracking.

The headline is misleading as iBeacon technology keeps the power in the user's hands.

http://beekn.net/2013/12/does-bluetooth-le-track-shoppers-no-but-your-app-does/
Dusanwriter
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Dusanwriter,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/9/2013 | 12:37:56 PM
Re: Apple only?
The great thing about Bluetooth LE is that it isn't an Apple-only technology. Most phones dating back a few years have it - Android included. The challenge is that the phone needs to have KitKat installed for the "beacon" potential to be unlocked - but yes, it's cross-platform.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
12/9/2013 | 9:14:14 AM
Re: Big Data for Retail
@Michael yes, to get the most out of the technology, stores will have to have their products neatly arranged and defnitively separated. However, sometimes putting things together is intentional, as the intent is that seeing a complementary product near the one the customer first gravitated toward may get him/her to add it on -- rather like the way Amazon puts up "People who bought __ also bought __"
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 3:20:53 AM
Big Data for Retail
"The iBeacon is sensitive enough to tell when a shopper is wandering past a table full of iPads or standing next to the iPhone accessories inside an Apple Store."

This is interesting. Apple stores display products very cleanly and effectively-- but a lot of others stores are cluttered jungles of messy stands, awkwardly-placed kiosks, garish signage, and clogged traffic paths. Technologies like iBeacon mean there will eventually be no excuse for this sort of poor retail space feng shui. Businesses will know which displays customers linger near, and which ones they pass without a second thought. It will let them know when people get clustered together, when storefront ads attract passersby, and so on. Lots of stuff that could be optimized, especially during busy periods such as the holiday shopping rush. 
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 3:15:53 AM
Re: Apple only?
I don't know that Android or Windows Phone has a specific technology that's really equivalent, but Cisco is a big proponent of this kind of tech. Cisco was involved with an app, for example, that's used for location-based services across a number of Vegas casinos. It relies on Wi-Fi networks and is available for both iOS and Android. Cisco showed it off last year at Interop and has also had its hand in a locaiton-based app for a museum in Atlanta, among a few others.

As for this, Apple is better than most companies at moving its user base to new tech. They've had some notable misses, but it looks like iBeacon could accelerate this sort of technology.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
12/6/2013 | 7:01:08 PM
Re: Annoying
The fewer notifications the better. And finding things in the store is not an issue. One can always ask the iEmployees. My ideal Apple Store experience is to arrive, buy, and leave as fast as possible.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
12/6/2013 | 3:24:06 PM
Apple only?
Is this only a "feature" in iOS, or do Android and Windows Phone devices have something similar in the offing?
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/6/2013 | 12:34:10 PM
Annoying
This would be more annoying than useful for me, but I can see better applications down the road: coupons for shoppers based on kiosks or stores they're near, exclusive deals, that sort of thing.


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