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What Windows 8 Needs Now
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Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
12/13/2013 | 2:45:04 PM
Re: no game need it
For some people, nothing's wrong with the scenario. But I think that's the problem-- it's only tenable for some.

I have a Surface Pro, and I find it useful only in specific scenarios. If I tried to do the majority of my typing (let alone all of it) on the Type Cover, I'd lose my mind. Depending on your use cases, convergence devices can be stellar, but they can also present compromises-- which is one reason (besides how Microsoft presented Windows 8 in the first place) that 2-in-1 devices are so divisive.

This limitation can be mitigated, of course. If you combine the Surface Pro with the Surface docking station, a USB mouse, a full-size keyboard, and a monitor, you'll have a very decent desktop replacement that also works as a (somewhat heavy) tablet and a (somewhat small) laptop. But collecting all that gear involves a fair amount of expense, which limits the market (especially the non-commercial market) to which the device appeals. I like the Surface line, as I've written a few times, but unless you fall into specific use cases, I still think they're too compromised to be used as primary devices and too expensive to recommend as companion devices.

I appreciate that you're defending touchscreen laptops, though. I don't think touchscreens add a ton to the experience (in fact, if I were going to buy a laptop tomorrow, I'd buy a MacBook Pro), but it's nice to have touch when you want it. After using the Suface Pro, I sometimes catch myself swiping at the screen when I switch back to a tradiitonal laptop. As I heard one of HP's PC guys argue recently-- even if you only use the touchscreen once per day, you'll be happy that it's there when you do. Some actions, such as swiping up or down a webpage, are much smoother with touch. That said, you can get a number of the same benefits on an Apple machine via their peerless trackpads.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
12/10/2013 | 5:47:32 PM
Re: no game need it
Yuschick

I don't get why point and click and touchscreen devices -as you say- should be separated. You can use any input @ any time according to your needs of the moment.
Let's suppose you're sitting comfortable on your cubicle with your new Surface Pro. While @ your desk, you might be using the type cover keyboard and a usb mouse. Let's say you need to attend a management meeting. You'll just take the Surface with you and use your fingers or a stylus.
What's wrong with this scenario?
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
12/10/2013 | 4:24:47 PM
Re: no game need it
Horrido

I'm sorry, but the availability of touch-enabled PCs does not prove anything.


We'll see where the market is heading after the holiday season. In any case, the laptops and hybrids with touchscreen didn't come to light the way we're seeing it right now thanks to Linux or OS X, did they?

Am I correct to assume that you don't own a Windows 8.1 computer with touchscreen? You can try use it for a while. You might like it

 
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 5:16:16 PM
More than a game needed
A great game certainly couldn't have hurt, but it wouldn't be some kind of panacea. As some have pointed out, Microsoft didn't really need to condition people to touch; Apple had already done that. But Microsoft did need to familarize users with Windows 8's particular brand of touch-- e.g. "charms" menus that need to be swiped into view, and so forth. And Microsoft did a pretty terrible job in this regard.

That said, I think that Windows 8.1 and the new Windows 2-in-1s are much better embodiments of the hybrid concept-- but as I've written before, I still think convergence is as much as compromise as a convenience. If you're one of the groups that can really benefit from a hybrid device, then more power to you. But I don't think those groups rise above niche status.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 3:24:33 PM
Re: Game
>The game was developed in 1989 by then intern Wes Cherry, who famously received no royalties from his work, like Windows, Gates ripped off as many people as he could to make millions

 

Was he really ripped off, or did he just sign an agreement without really thinking about the consequences? Content creators often sign bad contracts. A good attorney or a close reading of the terms might have helped.
Horrido
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Horrido,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/9/2013 | 9:47:15 AM
Re: no game need it
I'm sorry, but the availability of touch-enabled PCs does not prove anything. PC sales are slumping and manufacturers are desperate to prop up sales. They're hoping against hope that Windows 8 and a touch UI will turn things around. It won't; sales will continue to slide. (BTW, sales of touch-based PCs only represent about 10 per cent of total PC sales.)

While a touch UI is suitable for mobile devices, it is an ill fit for desktop PCs. Metro flies in the face of the desktop paradigm that allows you to see several application windows across the screen. This is why the paradigm was first chosen over 30 years ago–it supported multitasking well. We mustn't forget what Metro was designed for: to manage apps on a small screen (ie, handheld devices), where multiple application windows cannot be practically displayed.

Yes, there is a desktop mode in Windows 8, but this only highlights the schizophrenic nature of Windows 8. Bouncing between Metro and desktop mode is highly inelegant and jarring.

Yes, you can configure Windows 8 to avoid Metro altogether, but as ZDNet's Ed Bott points out, the process is more complicated than it needs to be, thereby scaring away potential adopters. In other words, for desktop users, Windows 8's "out-of-the-box" experience is terrible.

And finally, the ergonomics of Metro for desktop users is awkward. Raising your arm repeatedly to poke at the screen, even on a laptop, is undesirable (not to mention fingerprint smudges). Like I said, on a mobile device, this is suitable and even necessary. On a touch-enabled PC? I'm willing to bet that most users don't like it.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
12/9/2013 | 4:05:30 AM
no game need it
I think Windows 8 by itself is a game changer. Pun intend it.The stream of touch enable PCs and hybrids are proof of that.

I can't believe the array of comments talking trash about Windows 8, specially on the second page.. I thought I was reading comments from last year. Touch enable PCs, Windows 8 touch interface (aka Metro) and touchscreen input are here to stay. Deal with it.

 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
12/9/2013 | 12:25:34 AM
Re: What Windows 8 needs
This game looks interesting and I do like the point in the post - yes a fancy but simple game is the best tour guide for new Windows 8 OS. Compared to its Windows ancestors, Windows 7 do change a lot and provide a fantastic UI. But Windows 8 is not that surprising when it first comes to public. With a good game, we should not have much procrastination on adopting Windows 8 widely.
anon0450725016
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50%
anon0450725016,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/8/2013 | 10:39:36 PM
Game
The game was developed in 1989 by then intern Wes Cherry, who famously received no royalties from his work, like Windows, Gates ripped off as many people as he could to make millions
anon0450725016
50%
50%
anon0450725016,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/8/2013 | 10:39:36 PM
Game
The game was developed in 1989 by then intern Wes Cherry, who famously received no royalties from his work, like Windows, Gates ripped off as many people as he could to make millions
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