Comments
How Ancestry.com Manages Generations Of Big Data
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Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
12/14/2013 | 1:27:20 AM
Re: Cloud bursting and privacy
Excellent question, I think if privacy issues are going to cause harm to the customer then moving to the cloud in order to get access to more efficient hardware and framework will be difficult. Having said that, if DNA analysis can help pre flag for example, being lactose intolerant or having a greater chance of going into shock by something as miner as a bee sting, then customers will re-think their definition of privacy.

And I feel there is already a middle ground in place that cloud security and privacy can handle, even if privacy attitudes do not change.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
12/10/2013 | 3:17:12 PM
Ancestry.com, cloud burster
Ancestry.com has got the ideal problem to using cloud bursting with -- if there is such a thing as an ideal problem. PCI-compliant transaction handlers send the data into the cloud but retain the identifier, the name. As results come back, they can match names to transactions on-premises. Couldn't Ancestry do something like that?
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
12/10/2013 | 3:00:00 AM
Re: Privacy, cloud and big data
Privacy is not only the concern from Ancestry.com but from all big enterprises. The companies are seeking for the possible way to improve their IT capability and efficiency. Obviously going for cloud is one necessary step. But the privacy and other security issues are really of concern. Starting to work with private cloud sounds promising but in fact you just start to create data silos, which is not good in the long run.
Ulf Mattsson
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Ulf Mattsson,
User Rank: Strategist
12/9/2013 | 3:14:26 PM
Privacy, cloud and big data
I agree that "It gets really tricky because DNA data is so sensitive" and that the hard part is to "alleviate customers' privacy concerns".

Many organizations are looking to the cloud and outsourcing solutions for massive processing but international privacy laws are now escalating and organizations are desperately looking for effective ways to comply to these new stringent regulations. Europe and US are leading with very stringent privacy laws.

I studied one interesting project that addressed the challenge to protect sensitive information about individuals in a way that could satisfy European Cross Border Data Security requirements. This included incoming source data from various European banking entities, and existing data within those systems, which would be consolidated in one European country. The project achieved targeted compliance with EU Cross Border Data Security laws, Datenschutzgesetz 2000 - DSG 2000 in Austria, and Bundesdatenschutzgesetz in Germany by using a data tokenization approach.

I recently read an interesting report from the Aberdeen Group that revealed that "Over the last 12 months, tokenization users had 50% fewer security-related incidents(e.g., unauthorized access, data loss or data exposure than tokenization non-users". Nearly half of the respondents (47%) are currently using tokenization for something other than cardholder data The name of the study, released a few months ago, is "Tokenization Gets Traction".

Aberdeen has also seen "a steady increase in enterprise use of tokenization as an alternative to encryption for protecting sensitive data".

Ulf Mattsson, CTO Protegrity
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 2:47:37 PM
Cloud bursting and privacy
Interesting discussion of cloud bursting. We tend to discuss bursting in terms of capacity problems -- more power on a busy shopping day, for example -- but the privacy angle begs examination. What do you think cloud community? Is this approach advantageous for privacy?


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